Posts Tagged ‘Promises’

Its About You But Not Just You 2-25-18

In this sermon, based on Genesis 17:1-7, 15-16, I explore God’s ongoing covenant with Abraham. This promise continues to build on each step that God has laid out before, eventually going on to bless the entire world.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/its-about-you-but-not-just-you-2-25-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen.

As I continue to get older, I’m constantly being reminded that I am a creature of habit…and perhaps the greatest evidence of this happens when I’m driving my wife’s car. Now, many of you are likely aware of where I park. My maroon car sits on the other side of the parking lot, and has ever since we moved to town…and so its utter habit for me as I’m coming home to roll right past the driveway and swing into the parking lot…and in those instances when I’m in my wife’s car, its always right AFTER I pull into the parking lot that I realize my folly and I have to swing it around and pull into the garage.

This habit…and this tendency to always park in the same place goes way back for me…it’s a habit that I’ve had ever since I started driving. And my parking spot when I was a teenager was right alongside the garage at my parent’s place…a detached garage about 75 feet away from the front door…and just like my habit of pulling into the parking lot now…I would come driving into the yard and swing right up next the garage before throwing it in park and walking into the house.

Now I can remember doing that very thing countless times while I still lived with my parents…and more often than not it was after dark….because of course I was a teenager and I stayed out late…and I can remember, more often than not…of seeing the beautiful stars as I walked through the yard…and I can remember one time in particular…as I stepped out of the car and walked towards the door…of how amazingly bright and clear the stars were…even more vivid than normal…and it wasn’t until I walked inside to find candles lit that I realized the power was off and so the yard light was off.

Now this raises the question…have you ever seen the stars in the absence of light pollution…because it is utterly breathtaking…the clarity…and perhaps even more amazing…the magnitude of the stars in the night sky…a number that is beyond counting. (Pause)
Now perhaps you see where I’m going with this. Today’s scripture features Abraham…or Abram as he’s known on the front of end of today’s story…a man known as the first of the Old Testament patriarchs…a figure from the Old Testament who is arguably one of the most important and well known…probably right on par with Moses who’ll pop up in the book of Exodus a few centuries later.

A man…seemingly plucked from obscurity…chosen by God…and told…promised…that he would be blessed…that his name would become great…and that he would be the father of many nations…a promise which was illustrated by God telling him to go outside and look at the night sky…look and see the stars in their multitude…so shall your descendants be. (pause)
But Abram…his whole story is pretty incredible. For starters he’s a direct descendent of Noah, who we heard about last week…he was born about 10 or 11 generations after Noah, and Abram falls in the line of the oldest son of each respective generation…each father passing along the inheritance…the wealth…the power and influence to his oldest son…generation after generation until we get to Teran, Abram’s dad. Now over the course of these generations its thought that they amassed a fair amount of wealth and influence…and where they lived along the Euphrates river in present day Iraq, Abram’s family were the movers and the shakers…and then along comes God…telling Abram that he should leave the house of his father and go off into some unknown land that God will show him. And funny enough Abram says “Okay.”

Now here’s the thing…Abram is already 75 years old when this happens…no spring chicken by any means…though we do hear later that he lives another 100 years beyond this point so even though he’s well aged by this point, we could argue that Abram is still middle aged.

And Abram will go on variety of adventures during his time in the scriptures…his story covers a fair amount of Genesis, 20 or so odd chapters. There are some ups and downs…he prospers as God makes good on the promise to make his name great…but he also does some really dumb stuff like trying to pass off his wife Sarai as his sister for personal gain and saving his own skin…and not just once, but he does this twice.

Now for a few years…Abram and Sarai, along with their household travel around…before finally one night God appears to Abram again…and Abram has a question…Hey Lord…remember how you told me that I was going to be the father of many nations? Yah…umm…I don’t know if you noticed or not…but ummmm…I don’t have any kids…and my heir is just a dude that works for me…and you know I’m not getting any younger…and neither is Sarai…so you know umm…what should we do about that?

And God tells him to look at the stars once again…and God tells him the promise again…but this time God does something a little different…and God makes a covenant…but God does it in a really odd way. You see there was this custom that when two people made a covenant they’d take livestock…and they’d sacrifice them…and they’d cut the carcass in half and lay the pieces out on the ground…and then they’d walk between the pieces saying “If I don’t hold my end of the covenant, may what happened to these animals happen to me.” But God does things a little different…he has Abram cut up the animals and lay them out…but then as Abram watches…God appears as a firey lamp that passes between the animals…and God promises to give the land where they are to the descendants of Abram….like Noah last week, Abram receives a one-sided promise…and all he has to do is continue to trust that God will do what God says He’ll do. (pause)
Now, we gotta fast forward a few more years…Abram is about 86 now…so its been 10 or 11 years since God started making these promises…one that builds upon the one before it. And Abram still believes that God is going to give him descendants…but again…he and Sarai aren’t getting any younger…and they decide to take matters into their own hands…and Sarai gives her slave Hagar to Abram saying “Have children for me through her.” Yes its odd…but it happened in those days…it was actually quite common…and it worked…Abram has a son named Ishmael…And now, this whole situation does cause some angst in the household. But for the most part…Abram…well, he’s kinda okay…he’s got his son…he’s got a descendent…so maybe just maybe God’s finally making good on this whole thing…and with that we fast forward another 13 years…13 years…almost 25 since God made the promise in the first place…and for those 13 years, I can only imagine that Abram felt like everything was as it was supposed to be. (pause)
But God wasn’t done yet…because when God makes a promise…or in this case a covenant…it seems to me that God means it, even if God’s timing doesn’t quite line up with ours…and finally when Abram has reached the impressive age of 99…God shows up again.

Now here’s the thing about what we hear today…we hear, once again…that God makes a covenant…that God repeats the promise…and just like we heard before…God takes that same promise and goes one step farther.  First it was…leave your father’s house…leave his realm…leave everything that is familiar and beneficial for you…and go and I’ll give you lots of descendants…then a few years and several wacky adventures later…the promise grew to include the land…and now the promise grows yet again…we still hear of descendants…but we also hear that the covenant is between God and Abram…but its also between God and his offspring throughout all of their generations…an everlasting covenant that goes far beyond this one guy.

Now there’s some different stuff going on here…Abram is probably thinking to himself…well yah God…I’ve got my son here with me…we’re all good…but God’s not done…and we see another step…a name change…and Abram, which means exalted father by the way…becomes Abraham, which means father of many.

He receives a new identity because of what God is doing in him and through him…because of the promises made by God on his behalf…he is not the same person that he was before…And God takes this theme…this new idea of a new identity a step beyond Abraham…and we find that Sarai receives a new name as well…a new name that reminds Abraham that this promise of God is NOT just about him…but that whatever it is that God is up to…this new thing that is coming about through this covenant…through these ongoing…building…promises…it involves more than just one person. For God’s promise…whether they had trouble living up to it or not…was going to occur through Abraham and Sarah…and that the generations to come would come through her.

And yet…there is also truth in the promise that Abraham was the father of different nations…for blessings passed to Ishmael who would become the Arab nation…and blessings would pass to Isaac, the son of Abraham and Sarah, who would become the Jewish nation…and following the death of Sarah, Abraham remarried and had more children who would go to form other tribes and people…truly when God makes a promise, God makes good on it. (pause)We see this in the literal case for Abraham and his children…and we see it in the ongoing promise that God brings about through the covenant with Abraham and Sarah.
But what does all this mean for us today? That is, perhaps, the most important question…what can we learn…what truth can we take…what hope can we find in this story? (pause) Perhaps the truth that we find is in the reminder that the promises God makes on our behalf…they aren’t just limited to us. We are included in this original promise and covenant that God made with Abraham…we are included in the generations that came after him…we are heirs to this promise…but just as God continued to build on the promises he made each time to Abraham…God has continued to build upon the promises as they come to us…and through Christ…through what Christ has done…we are also given a new identity, just as Abraham was. We are given the identity, beloved child of God.

But we must also remember that this new identity given to us by God, goes beyond us as individuals.  The good news of Jesus Christ is meant to bless all the world…and in response to the grace that God has shown us when we are claimed…the blessing flows through us into others…and just as Sarai became Sarah through the promise made to Abraham…the promise that we are made God’s children flows through us and changes the identity of those who come after us. (pause)

Now I started this whole thing off by talking about the stars…and here’s the thing about the stars…about the amazingly vast cosmos out there.  When the lights are all off…we can see a mind-blowing number of stars…but the number of stars in the heavens that we can’t see…its beyond measure. And the same God who made them…who placed them in the cosmos has made a promise that we are all a part of…that his blessing is also beyond measure…its beyond measure in its magnitude for each of us as an individual…and its beyond measure in the scope of who its for…reaching far beyond what we can see or comprehend.

May you remember that the promises of God that are found in the scriptures…they’re about you…but not only you. May they pass through you to bless others as well. Amen.

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Its A Symbol 2-18-18

In this sermon, based on Genesis 9:8-17, I explore the covenant that God made with Noah and with all life following the destruction of the flood.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/its-a-symbol-2-18-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

As a species, humanity loves symbols. We have symbols for all kinds of stuff…and rightly so. Symbols serve a good purpose…to remind of us things…to represent something specific.  Some symbols are patriotic like a bald eagle or the US flag. Other symbols work to keep us safe, like the red and green lights on a traffic symbol, telling us when to go and when to stop.

There are countless different symbols representing countless different things surrounding us at any given time…and this is true here in the church as well…we love our symbols here…the cross is an obvious one…reminding us of the hope that we find in the death and resurrection of Christ.  The ever-present Christ candle burning up here on the altar is another one, a visual reminder that the light is always shining in the darkness.

Our different liturgical colors are another symbol…purple and red, green and white and blue…all pointing towards different seasons of the church year with different focal points…

We have different traditions that act like symbols too…things that we do that mark a certain day or are intended to help us consider something specific…the candles that we light on Christmas Eve…the Ashes spread on our foreheads just a few days ago on Ash Wednesday…the slamming of the book on Good Friday, or the smell of the lilies on Easter morning.

All of these things are good things…meaningful things…and all of them, in one way or another…are symbols. (pause) Now I’ve been thinking about this idea of symbols a lot…and I also realized that there are certain things that can also symbolize an end, the finishing of a chapter in life…and as I thought about this, I remembered something that I saw quite a few years back during the 2004 Summer Olympic games.

Some of you may remember the name Rulon Gardner…He was a Greco-Roman wrestler…he had sorta come out of nowhere 4 years earlier…shocking everyone by beating the reigning Olympic heavyweight champion from Russia…and then everyone expected him to repeat and win the gold again in 2004…and maybe just maybe to go on winning…as he had said many times that he would continue to compete until someone came along that could beat him…but that when that happened, he would retire.

And then…in his semi-final match…he lost…and so he had just one more match, to wrestle for the bronze medal, a match that he did win…but once it was over, Rulan Gardner joined a long tradition of wrestlers…he walked out to the center of the mat…bent down and began to untie his shoes…finally taking them off and leaving them in the center of the mat…a tradition…a symbol to represent his retirement.

Now the cheers from the crowd were incredible…as everyone recognized and honored his great commitment to the sport…but you could see the sadness and anguish on his face, tears in his eyes as he set his shoes down, because this symbol meant something different to him…it was a reminder that wrestling was over, all the work, all the competition…it was all done.

Now that’s where I want to connect into the scripture…we have heard today the story of God making a covenant with Noah following the flood…a story that many of us know quite well. The world had grown evil and sinful…and God decides to cleanse the earth of its wickedness with a great flood…but there’s one guy…Noah…and he’s upright and righteous…and so God decides to spare Noah and his sons and their wives…so God has Noah build a great big boat…and together with his family and a whole slug of animals that God has sent 2 by 2…they float around on all this flood water while the rest of life on the earth is destroyed.

The rains fall for 40 days…but the flood itself lasts WAY longer than that…Noah and his crew are actually on the ark for an entire year before God finally remembers them and calls them to come out.  Now, with this, Noah is so happy to be back on dry ground that he builds an altar and makes a sacrifice to God…and then God starts talking to Noah.

Now the first thing we hear, just before our reading starts up today…is a reminder from something going all the way back to the beginning…as we hear that all of humankind has been made bearing the divine image of God…and then God takes look at Noah and says something that sounds, downright familiar…be fruitful and multiply…the exact same thing God has said clear back in the story of the creation with Adam and Eve…and maybe that makes sense…humanity has essentially been wiped out, and the animal population wasn’t fairing much better, so maybe it stands to reason that God would need to repeat this command to go out and do what life does…to live and multiply.

But with this, God makes a promise…and as we hear today…God must think its pretty important because we hear it repeated several times over. I establish my covenant with you and your descendants…and with all the animals and the birds…with all life for all generations to come…never again will I destroy the earth by flood.

And then again…I establish my covenant with you, that never again shall flesh be cut off by flood, never again will flood destroy the earth…And then we hear of a sign…a sign of the covenant…which covenant…the one that is between me and you and between me and all flesh…and what is that sign? I have set my bow in the clouds…and when I see it I will remember the covenant that I have made with you and with all flesh to never destroy the earth…Yes when that bow is in the clouds I will see it and I will remember the everlasting covenant between me and all flesh…

And then God reminds Noah one more time…just for good measure….This is the sign of the covenant between me and all flesh on the earth. (pause) Did you sense a trend there?

I can only think that God wants to make it abundantly clear that he is making a covenant with ALL life, not just Noah but all life that this utter destruction will never happen again…and that there is a sign for it…the bow that God has set in the clouds. (pause)
Now here’s the thing that I think is pretty important…this covenant, which interestingly enough is the very first covenant that God makes with humanity in the scriptures…this covenant is utterly one-sided. Now that’s not typically the case is it. Anytime there’s a covenant, or a contract or whatever we want to call it…both parties typically bring something to the table don’t they?

But not this time…God literally asks nothing of Noah or his sons or the rest of humanity…the only person who is beholden to anything here is God…who will see the sign of the covenant in the clouds and will remember…God will remember that the destruction of the earth is over. Just like a wrestler putting his shoes on the mat, signifying the end of all the work and the sacrifice and the competition, God remembers that destruction is over. (pause)

Now this is all pretty amazing, but it makes me stop and think just what is it that God was destroying in the first place? That’s the funny thing about this whole story…that even though this is one that we typically consider nice and cute…and we see images of Noah and the Ark and all the animals smiling under a rainbow in church nurseries and storybook Bibles…but in the end we need to remember that this is utter devastation on the part of God…and that’s sort of eye opening.

Now, at times when I’ve talked about this, I’ve heard people say that the God of the Old Testament seems to be angry and judgmental and full of wrath…but interestingly enough…that’s not what causes God to send the flood…If you don’t believe me, go home and look it up, its in Genesis 6 if you’re looking…and if we look back we find that humankind has become wicked and evil…But God isn’t angry…God is sorry that he has created us…God grieves the existence that humanity has taken on…and it has only taken 10 generations since Adam and Eve. 10 generations to move from the Tov…from the Very Good of God’s creation that has culminated in humanity to God literally being sorry that we were created in the first place.

Let that sink in…We have a God who grieves in the mess that we have made of our existence and our reality…and all I have to do today is say the words “recent events” and I’m guessing many of you out there today are going start nodding your heads…because its not hard to understand God’s grief with how humanity treats one another is it? (Long pause)

And yet…God’s not done with us yet. And we know its true because as we heard, over and over again…God has made a promise, a covenant…never again…and God has given us a symbol…a bow set in the clouds.

Now here’s the thing about that bow…for us, its become a beautiful symbol hasn’t it…the rainbow…a bright and vibrant splash of color in the sky showing us that the storm is over…now I’ve seen many rainbows in my life…but never so bright and clear as the ones that I see at camp in the mountains of Colorado. I can only think that the conditions are perfection for the creation of rainbows there…as afternoon storms come rolling down the mountain which faces west, into the afternoon soon…and the storms let loose for about 10 minutes, and then the clouds slide farther on down the mountain, out across the valley to the east that overlooks the next range…and as the clouds slide by the afternoon sun lights up those clouds and the most vivid rainbows come in to focus…sometimes doubles…and I’ve even seen a triple before…and its gorgeous and it literally serves as a sign that the storm is over and its safe to go outside again.

But the sign is different for God than it is today…and maybe just maybe it was different for our brothers and sisters of ancient times…because what if God wasn’t just talking a rainbow…what if God was talking about a weapon?

You see, in ancient times, it was thought that when a storm came over, some divine being up in the heavens, didn’t matter which culture you were a part of, but whoever your god was…they thought that god was shooting arrows at the earth in the bolts of lightning that would come crashing down…but what if that divine being has made a promise to hang up the bow that fires the arrows?

Maybe that’s what this symbolizes…that the one who is capable of bringing utter destruction upon the earth is hanging up the weapon that causes it…and if we think about that bow…its pointing up away from the earth.  Just like a wrestlers shoes signify the end of his career…the weapon being hung up serves as a symbol to signify the end of destruction.

And as we mentioned before…this covenant, this promise is utterly one sided, which if we think about many of our Biblical figures, perhaps becomes quite apparent. God made this covenant with Noah…and it took approximately 4 verses for Noah to screw up and in a drunken stupor begin cursing his offspring.  Likewise, Adam and Eve…the epitome of the Good creation of God…they lasted 6 verses.  God’s chosen people the Israelites….the ones who received the law through Moses…they were literally breaking the 1st commandment in the same instant that God was giving Moses the commandments.

I bring all this up to remind us that humanity has always been, and will continue to be broken and flawed…and yet out of God’s divine favor for those made in his image, he has promised us never again. But what is even more amazing than that…out of that divine favor comes another promise, one that is made real for each us through the life death and resurrection of Jesus Christ…that through him we have been claimed…and we have been given a sign of that promise as well…2 of them actually…one we’ll share in a few moments when we hear the body of Christ broken for you, the blood of Christ shed for you.

And the other one…interestingly enough it has to do with water as well…for our baptism serves a physical reminder of the promise that God has made on your behalf…a promise that speaks of your identity as far as God is concerned.

But, even though the covenant is one-sided…in the waters of our baptism we are also invited into something different…because we are invited into the work of reconciling this world back to God through the Good News of Jesus Christ, the one who has redeemed this broken world that we are a part of…this broken world that all too often seems dark and dreary and hopeless…especially in light of recent news.

And yet…just as the rainbow serves as a reminder of the promise that God made to the world…just as our baptism serves as a reminder of the promise that God has spoken into our lives as individuals…may we continue to find hope…and not only that but may we carry the source of that hope out into this dark broken world, so that maybe, just maybe we can begin to see the Kingdom of Heaven come near for all people. Amen.

2 Sides to the Same Coin 11-5-17

In this sermon for All Saints Sunday, taken from 1 John 3:1-3, I explore the promise made by God, through Christ, that have been claimed as God’s children now. One day we will see what this means for us in the eternal sense, but we cling to the hope now.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/2-sides-to-the-same-coin-11-5-17

You can follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

I’ve often found that scientific concepts can be explained in one of 2 ways…the really technical way that is difficult to understand…also known as the hard way…and then…the easy way.  An example…Newton’s third law of motion states “all forces between two objects exist in equal magnitude and opposite direction.” The hard way…now the easy way…every action has an opposite reaction…I think I like the easy way better.

As I think about this…it points me in the direction of thinking about how there are a lot of opposites in the world…a lot of things that seem to have a counter-part on the other side of the line…almost like saying that there are two sides to every coin.

I think this is the case, not only in the world…but in life too…that there are events or situations that happen in life that that seem to have an opposite counterpart…some of which are celebrated here in the church…and perhaps the most fitting pair of opposites that comes to mind is how we celebrate both new life, particularly in terms of the baptism of an infant here in the font, and we also recognize the end of life through funerals.

Now this idea certainly ties in with the theme of the day…All Saints Sunday…when we take the time to stop and remember the individuals who have died over the course of the past year…as we consider those who have come before us in life, and gone on ahead of us into whatever it is that lies on the other side of death.

Now death is an odd aspect of our existence…one that we acknowledge…but that admittedly we don’t give a whole lot of focus within the church year.  Out of the countless worships services that we share every year, week in and week out, not to mention the special services on certain holidays…there are only 3 that really zero in on death.  Ash Wednesday when we are reminded of our own mortality. Good Friday when we remember the death of our Lord Jesus.  And today…All Saints Sunday. (pause)

Now to consider death is also to consider funerals…the worship services we have to commend the individual into the care of the Lord…and many of you sitting out there today have likely had the opportunity to hear me preach at a funeral before…but if you haven’t, you should know that there’s a question that I pose each time. Why are we here?

I pause for a moment and then I answer the question with a two-fold answer…an answer that probably seems to come off as 2 sides of the same coin. We gather at funerals to mourn the death while at the same time to celebrate the life of the individual.

Now as we think about that, perhaps we begin to see that those two aspects of a funeral each have their place within the context of those different “death oriented days” in the church year.  Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, we tend to be pretty focused on the mourning part…while the general idea of All Saints Sunday is to celebrate the life and the witness of those who have come before us, and now have gone on ahead of us past that great unknown barrier known as death. (pause)

This is now the 5th time I’ve celebrated All Saints Sunday with you here at Underwood…and as I think back over the years, I remember the names that have been read as the candles were lit. 19 people over the course of the past 5 years…and as I think about those names, I remember the relationships that center around each of them…and I think about the way things felt around their death…and I imagine that it goes without saying that each one of them is a little different.image1

Take for instance…Gladys Carrigan…she’s the first candle over there today…I think about her death, one year ago today actually…and the circumstances that surrounded that wonderful 104 year old woman. Several people asked me how she died, and I could only respond…well she was 104.  Her funeral was a wonderful celebration of her life, I think any who were there would agree. But hers is not the only candle there today. (pause) There are 5 others. I look at them, I think about the names that will be read when we reach that part of our service in a few more minutes. (pause)

And then I look at the final candle, the one that we will light as we share the name Marcia Hastings…Marcia died just last week…with the news slowly trickling out…news which is painful to consider. News that some of you know, but that I fear will catch many of you by surprise to hear that Marcia took her own life…and it is in this shocking and painful news that we remember the truth about death.  That no matter how it happens…no matter what the circumstances…death just feels…somehow…wrong.  (pause)

If there is one truth that unites every instance of death…a truth that perhaps compounds this sense of wrongness…it is that death somehow creates a barrier…a separation between those of us still in this life, and those who have gone on to whatever it is that lies on the other side. (pause)

We never know how or when this painful truth will strike us…as those of us still in this life feel the sting of absence…even as we cherish the memory of those we have loved and lost…and yet this is our reality…one that goes beyond our ability to comprehend. (pause)

But as we must do…when we come face to face with death, we cling to the promise of new life made possible by God through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ…a promise which is given to us right here, right now…a promise that grants us hope in the midst of the lives that we live…and a promise which be made new in whatever lies beyond the barrier of death…yet to be revealed to us.

This is the hopeful promise that is given to us repeatedly in the short reading from 1 John today…an assurance of who we are now…or perhaps more importantly, Who’s we are today.  (pause) We are reminded that out of God’s great love for us…out of God’s delight, we are claimed…and we are called children of God…and that is what we are.  And if we didn’t quite catch it the first time, John repeats it for us…Beloved…we ARE God’s children NOW.  This is the promise made real for us in Jesus Christ, that through him we are made heirs of the promise…we are claimed and given this same birthright.

The only question is what that’s going to look like in the life to come…and the author recognizes this ambiguity…we are God’s children now…what we will be…has not…yet…been…revealed…but when it is revealed…we will be like God, for we will see him as he is…We won’t BE God…but we will be like him, for the broken parts of us will be stripped away and we shall see that we are all truly made bearing God’s divine image. (pause)

The promise of the life to come, whatever its going to look like gives us hope to live our lives today, on this side of death…in a way that reflects the joy and the love of God in each one of us. And this is what we must cling to in the face of pain and brokenness and death…because of the assurance that somehow, someway…through Jesus Christ and his perfect love for each us…God has overcome that which is so WRONG about death. (pause)

Today we acknowledge those who have come before us…we remember those who lived their lives in the hope of God’s promise…and we remember those who now have crossed over into whatever it is that we can’t see yet.  We acknowledge the joy of their memory…we acknowledge the pain of their absence…and above all…we cling to the hope given to us now…that through Christ, we will one day experience what they already know to be true. Amen.

Let’s Plant Some Seeds 3-22-15

This week’s sermon is based on John 12:20-33. Jesus shares a micro-parable in the midst of teaching during his final week of life. In the parable he talks about the need for a seed to die before it can bear fruit. I take this concept and connect into baptism, as a brother and sister were baptized during worship.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/lets-plant-some-seeds-3-22-15

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:
Grace and peace to you from God our Father and our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen
Last Friday turned into one heck of a fine day didn’t it? Bright and sunny and warm. Just one of quite a few beautiful days that we’ve experienced in the past few weeks as this unseasonably warm March sneaks past us.
Now don’t get me wrong, I’ve been enjoying all this gorgeous weather just as much as everyone else…but I have to admit to being somewhat pessimistic about its longevity…I’ve been talking to a lot of different people throughout the course of the past several weeks…and in each instance, when the weather comes up I’ve said the same thing. “Boy its sure nice, and I’ll take it…but I don’t expect it to last.” (pause)
Its just so early isn’t it? And it feels like we’re cheating…having it be so great this early in the year…and perhaps we’re all thinking the same thing…its not gonna last…winter is going to rear its head again. We’ve all seen the horrible March weather…and the unexpected April snowstorms…even after gorgeous warm weather…and so while we love the weather we’ve been having, I don’t think anyone is ready to declare it springtime yet. (pause)
But maybe we should…Friday marked the first day of Spring…at least in terms of the season on the calendar…so whether we want to admit it or not, it is “Officially” springtime. But like many of you out there, I don’t judge seasons by the calendar…but by what nature is actually telling us…and I have to admit…that nature seems to be saying that spring has arrived.
I’ve been seeing robins hopping around for a couple weeks now…there are little tints of green springing up in many of the lawns around town…and a week ago, last Sunday morning as I walked across the parking lot I noticed that there’s a tulip up in our corner flowerbed out on the southeast corner of the church. There’s really only one more sign that I’m looking for at this point…the sign I look for every year that, in my head anyway…announces that spring is really around…something I call green mist…that faint hint of green as the buds break on the trees and the tiny little leaves unfurl.
And when I see that for the first time, I get pretty giddy…because it means that once again…the new life of spring has kicked in…and perhaps it’s the fact that I’m a farm kid through and through…but spring is just an exciting time.
Just the other day I heard that calving season is well underway, as one of our members got 5 in a single day…and that’s just one aspect of new life…and another is the fact that each and every farmer is already chomping at the bit to get out there into the fields…to get them ready…and eventually…to put seed in the ground.
I have to admit to you…it never ceases to amaze me to witness the presence of hope in a farmer. Each and every year they faithfully prepare the ground…and then plant the seed…trusting that the seed is going to do what it’s supposed to do…trusting that the weather and the soil and everything else will do its part…so that tiny little seed can sprout…and grow…throw up a shoot and push out some roots…and before you know it…that tiny seed has produced a cornstalk 8 feet high with 3 or 4 ears full of kernels…just like the one that was planted in the first place…and then in the fall, the harvest comes in…the result of all that work…and all that time…and all that trust that nature…is gonna due what we hope. (pause)
Its true…you want to see the notion of faith and hope in action…just watch the farmers…because they live it each and every year…and since spring seems to be here…we’re just about to see them do it again. (pause)
Now most of you know by now that I am a plant guy…my undergrad degree from Iowa State University…so tragically knocked out of the big dance in round one…*hand on heart* rest in peace…is in horticulture…and so anytime our scripture lesson features something of a farming metaphor I tend to perk up just a little bit…and this week’s is certainly a doosy…and it speaks to exactly that point that I was making about the farmers…Jesus himself tells us that unless a seed falls into the ground and dies, it remains the same…if a seed isn’t planted…it stays the seed…but throw it in some dirt and add water…and something remarkable happens…but it happens at the expense of the seed itself. (pause)
Have you ever thought about that…the notion that the seed has to die? (pause) Maybe it doesn’t seem like it when we first think about it…after all its growing right? Producing the plant…doesn’t that mean that its actually alive? (pause) Well, yes, from a certain of view…but the seed itself…its no more…the seed itself…dies to itself…the seed is gone…and something else replaces it…something that in time…multiplies…
Now here’s the strange thing about this little micro-parable that Jesus shares in our gospel today. It’s not super clear exactly what he’s talking about. Is he talking about himself? Is he talking about us and our lives of faith? Just what is it?
His previous statement doesn’t help a whole lot to set it up does it? The hour has come for the Son of Man to be glorified…ummm okay…and how exactly? Well…according to Jesus, by a death that will result in much fruit. (pause) Now Jesus goes on from there and he talks about those loving their life on earth losing it and vice versa…so maybe it seems at first glance that he is talking about us with the whole dying seed thing…but if we keep going…right up to the end of this passage we hear him say “When I am lifted up from the earth, I will draw all people to myself” indicating the death he would experience…that death on a cross when he is lifted up to hang there in agony…and we hear that this draws in all people.
And so perhaps when we look at it from this perspective we see that the seed that Jesus is talking about really is him…and make no mistake…Jesus, like that seed…dies. (pause) In just a couple more weeks…Jesus Christ…the Son of God…the one who calls himself I Am…the one who is God…will be betrayed by one that he loves…one that he has just shared bread and wine with…and he will be beaten…and eventually he will be nailed to a cross…and he…then…dies. (pause)
But here’s the amazing thing about all this…both the death of Jesus…and the death of that seed that we keep talking about…in the death…it becomes something new…the seed puts down roots and puts up a shoot…and Jesus puts down death…and raises up the church.
We are the fruit…you, me, everyone in this room…and dare I even say everyone else in the world as well…because Jesus says that…in his death…when his earthly life is over…he tells us that he draws all people to himself. (pause) Now just how that works I can’t tell you…its above my paygrade as they say…but just as the farmers plant those seeds every spring, trusting and hoping that nature will do what its supposed to…I trust that Jesus does what he promises….that Jesus creates new life and offers it to each of one us…and he proves it…because of the new life that he embodied on that Sunday morning when he walked out of the tomb…and through his life, his death, and his resurrection…he bears much fruit…and he will continue to do so. (pause)
Now perhaps you’re wondering if there is a sign for all this…a sign beyond the empty tomb and the resurrected Jesus…and the wonderful thing about our faith…is that we have signs. Jesus saw fit to give us physical signs that connect us to his life and death and resurrection that happened some 2000 odd years ago…because he told us that when we sit down and break bread together, and share a glass of wine…that he is there…and that IS his body and blood broken and poured for you…he made that promise…and he made another one…
Jesus also promised us that when we take water, and we wash one another along with the words that you are baptized in the name of the father and of the son and of the holy spirit that God comes to us in that as well.
In a few moments, two small children will come to this font, brought forth by their parents in the presence of all of you as witnesses…all of you who represent the body of Christ…you are the plant…and the fruit that has grown up from the seed of Christ that died on that cross all those years ago…and when Coltin and McKenzie are washed in the water, and they hear those words, they will take their place among you…as fellow members of the body of Christ…joining together in a death like his…drowning that sinful self that resides within each one of us…and rising up from the water a new creation… (pause)
And may it be our hope…and our prayer…that today the seed of faith is planted in their lives…and together, as parents and sponsors and fellow members of the body of Christ, may we do our part to nurture that seed…to be the soil and water and the sunshine…so that it may blossom into a beautiful life of faith…Come Holy Spirit…and make this hope a reality…not only for these two beautiful children…but for each and every one of us…Amen.