Posts Tagged ‘Parable’

Do We Expect the Spirit 10-15-17

IMG_4019

In this sermon, based on Matthew 22:1-14, I explore the parable of the wedding banquet. Do we expect to be changed when we encounter God? Maybe we should.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/do-we-expect-the-spirit-10-15-17

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

Many of you are familiar with the fact that in my former life, or the time before I became a pastor…that I started off my career managing golf courses. During that season of my life, I was employed on the maintenance crew at 2 different courses…the first through my college years, and the second for about 2 years after graduating.

Now as is the case with most things…different golf courses are going to be managed in different ways. The first was larger with a bigger crew, the second had a smaller crew…and this became most evident on the weekends.  Pretty much every course that I am aware of works an abridge schedule on the weekends. It’s the busy time for the course, so the workers show up, perhaps a touch earlier than on a weekday…they do the bare minimum, which is usually mowing the greens and raking the bunkers…and then they get out of the way. This was actually the case at both of those courses. The difference emerged when we looked at when crew members were on weekend duty. The first course offered a rotation…and we were pretty much on duty every other weekend, both Saturday and Sunday…but the second was a little different. A couple guys worked Saturday morning, and a couple of us worked Sunday morning…me included.

Now my boss there knew that I was a church-goer…and given every possibility that I wanted to make it to worship…and typically that worked ok…we’d get done what we needed and I’d have to time to get home, get cleaned up and head to church.

But there was one time that things were a little different…and it happened to occur on the day that one of my nieces was going to be baptized a couple towns over. Long story short…the service would take place earlier than I normally needed to be at church…and we had some extra going on workwise…and I got out, with just enough time to make the mental decision about either stopping off at home to try and clean up…or to show up for the baptism in my grubby clothes. (pause) Long story short, that day I set the record for the fastest I’ve ever gotten ready. In the door, shower, dressed in a full suit, and out the door again in 6 minutes…Now I easily could have shown up for the baptismal service grubby, and no one probably would have cared…but I felt like I needed to be a little more presentable. (pause)

Now that very idea brings me around to the gospel. Another parable…another story told by Jesus to illustrate the importance of our response to the invitation of the Lord into the Kingdom of Heaven…and its an interesting one.

A king is throwing a banquet for his son’s wedding. The invitations have already gone out to the king’s chosen guest list…but for whatever reason…once everything is ready and the king sends his messengers off with the call to show up…everyone on the guest list declines…some offer excuses…some get riled up and literally killed the messengers…the king in turn…he gets all riled up as well, sends out his soldiers to kill the perpetrators and burn down their city…which is lovely to say the least. But then the king tells his servants, go out…and anyone you find, invite them in because this banquet honoring my son…it will be filled…and this is precisely what happens.  And you know its interesting…the king doesn’t discriminate does he…bring them in…the good and the bad. And the wedding is filled.

Now here’s the thing…how many of those people out walking the streets…or working in the fields…how many of them do you suppose were carrying a wedding robe at the time?  (pause) Think about it? Why would they…there’s no reason for them to think on this particular day that the king was going to invite them into a banquet…but if a representative of the king grabs you and says “come to his banquet” you go…period…right then and there…there would be no option of stopping off at home for a 6 minute clean up session so they could arrive with a suit on.

But apparently there are robes aren’t there? There must be…because, as we hear…there’s an issue on this basis…one we’ll talk a bit more about momentarily…and so…it raises the question of just where are they getting the robes?

It stands to reason that the host provides them…that as they come in…they follow social decorum…knowing they need to accept the robe…and the host knows he needs to provide them…and everyone follows decorum…and the party gets going…and the king does a walk through and everything is peachy…until the king lays eyes on this one guy…this guy who has the audacity to NOT…be wearing a wedding robe.

The king asks him why…he of course has no good answer and is standing there silenced out of his guilt in the face of the king and host…and as we hear…there are consequences. (pause)
Now I’ve run over this in my head time after time…and I’ve wondered…what’s up with this guy. He knows the expectations…he walked in with everyone else…he showed up at the party…but when he reached the door and one of the servants offered him the robe…I can only think that he looked at them…checked out his own attire and thought… “Nah…I’m good.” (pause) But considering what ultimately happens…it would seem that no, he’s not good as is…and the change was expected. (pause)
So what’s that mean for us today? What’s this robe? What’s this wedding banquet? What are these expectations that Jesus is trying to broadcast for us? (Pause) I’ve wrestled with these questions quite a bit…because to talk about banquet in the scriptures seems like a pretty obvious reference to the heavenly banquet that we’ve been invited to…and if we proclaim, over and over again…that God invites as we are…and yes I believe that to be true…then what are we supposed to learn from the guy who takes a look at the robe offered by the host and thinks “Nah I’m good.”

Maybe the only conclusion that we can reach is that simply showing up at the banquet isn’t enough…maybe its insufficient to think that we can just be here and then walk out the same as when we walked in.

What are the “clothes” that we might need to change? What are the practices or understandings or ways of thinking that we might be called to set aside? What things might God ask us to take off and set down, so that we might emerge different than when we came in? (pause)

As I think along these lines, I find myself asking an important question…do we, as believers in Christ, enter into situations where God is present expecting to see change? What do we expect? Do we anticipate the Holy Spirit to be active…to blow through and change us? Or do we think that we can just be present for the event…whatever it is…and then walk away as if nothing significant has happened?

Now there are a lot of different events or situations that we could consider…but perhaps the easiest one to think about is worship…do we show up here at 10:15 on Sunday morning with the expectation that there will be something different about us when we walk out at 11:30? Because if we don’t, we are selling the Holy Spirit short in a big bad way. (pause)
There’s something that I do every week that perhaps you’ve noticed…and I’ve been asked about it before…at the end of worship, in the midst of the final hymn…once the acolyte walks out, I step out of my pew and stand in the front of the aisle for just a brief moment…and as I do I say a prayer thanking God for whatever the Spirit accomplished during this worship time…but there’s another thing I do that no one probably notices…at the beginning of worship, right after the organist makes eye contact with me and I’m about to walk up the aisle, I ask for the Spirit to show up…and we never know how that will happen do we?

Sometimes the Spirit shows up when a child asks the perfectly timed question during the children’s sermon…sometimes the Spirit shows up when I sing Jesus Loves Me and the music for offering happens to be the same song…sometimes the Spirit shows up when I’m sermonating about God talking to us in many ways and someone’s phone rings.

These are just a few ways that have happened in this sanctuary…and there are many others, some that are blatantly apparent and some that perhaps we fail to recognize…but I return to the question…what do we expect of the Spirit when we enter into a situation…and do we come with the expectation that we will be changed in the midst of it?

The apostle Paul tells us that if we are in Christ we are new creation…and this isn’t something that we merely pay lip service to…but we need to think of this in the same way that Paul does in the original language…because they way he writes it implies some pretty serious astonishment at play…if anyone is in Christ…NEW CREATION!!!!!!

And we can rest assured that is what the parable is trying to tell us…because throughout the New Testament we continue to hear imagery of clothing ourselves…to be clothed in righteousness…to be clothed in Christ…and my friends this is very sacramental when think about it…for to put on Christ happens in the waters of our baptism when we are empowered with the Holy Spirit…and we are joined together with the body of Christ. And interestingly enough, the last time I preached on this passage one of our blessed children was being baptized in this font.

But this is not to say that the “wedding robe” that we put on only happens once in our lives…but we must remember that every single day…each and every moment we are called to embody the reality of death and new life…something that is literally happening in our very bodies every moment. (pause)

Did you know that in your body…in any given moment about 300 million cells die…and in that same moment, your body gives rise to 300 million new ones to replace them? You are literally dying and rising again during every single instant of your lifetime…and even more amazing…you were intentionally made that way by the one who has made new life possible through the life death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. (pause)
God created us to quite literally, become new every moment…so let us live out every day, every moment, every situation in a way that reflects this…let us live our lives in a way that reflects the change that comes upon us through the presence of the Holy Spirit…the presence of God in us and around us.

We cannot expect to remain the same…for to try and remain the same is to deny the very being that God has made us in the first place. Amen.

Advertisements

What Did You Do 7-23-17

In this sermon, based on Matthew 13:24-30, 36-43, I explore the parable of the wheat and the weeds. We find that there is good and bad all mixed up together in this life, as well as within us as individuals. It is not our job to remove it, but simply to live our lives. We trust, even in the midst of questions, that God will act.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/what-did-you-do-7-23-17

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

There comes a time in the life of every young person, somewhere within the transitional years between childhood and adulthood, when they come face to face with an often times painful reality. If you cause a problem, then you’re responsible to help rectify it.

I myself learned this lesson at about age 12, and it had to do with apples and broken windows in an abandoned farm house, but I’m not going to go into that today…rather I’d like to share the story that my dad told me of when he was just a couple years older…and he learned this same lesson first hand.

Now what you need to know about my dad, is that he’s the second of six kids, and his older brother Jim is about 3 years older. And shortly before this story takes place, my grandfather, their dad, had some pretty major reconstructive surgery on a bad hip…and so grandpa was pretty well laid up for most of this particular year…and so the bulk of the farming fell on Jim at about 17, and dad at 14.

No it goes without saying that in those days, probably far more so than now adays, the kids started in on the farm work pretty young, and so my uncle Jim had a pretty decent handle on how things needed to happen, even though he was still a high school student…and one morning, he’d mentioned to dad that the young corn shoots out in the field were due to be cultivated.

I’m pretty sure Jim was just mentioning that in passing, because at that point, Dad hadn’t tried cultivating yet…but as with any young whippersnapper…he was pretty sure he could pull it off…so dad got home from school, while Jim was still at football practice…and my 14 year old father hopped up on the tractor and started cultivating…and he’d made several passes back and forth across the field before Jim got home.

Now here’s the thing…dad was ever so slightly off in his placement over the rows…and while he didn’t uproot the corn…he was somehow managing to cover it up with soil…and you can imagine just how happy big brother was when he saw what dad was up to.

Dad saw his brother storming out towards the tractor…all red in the face…and while my uncle’s exact words are not very appropriate for me to repeat today…it can be best summed up “WHAT DID YOU DO?” (pause) Now dad learned that hard lesson of responsibility to clean up your mistakes by spending the next couple of hours uncovering each corn plant by hand, while Jim finished up the cultivating. (pause)
Now the idea of farming shouldn’t come as a great shock today as we consider yet another parable of Jesus…this time, the parable of the weeds in the wheat.

We hear of the master of the house going on to sow his field…and while the idea of sowing a wheat field might seem a little foreign to those of us who are used to seeing row upon row of corn or soybeans out in the field…its not that difficult to figure out…wheat is a grain, actually its in the grass family…and a wheat field is seeded just like a lawn…you just scatter the seeds out over the surface…and it all grows up like a carpet.

But as we hear…once the master has done the work of sowing the wheat seed…an enemy comes along in the night and plants weeds…actually something called tares in the original language…a plant that starts off its life looking an awful lot like the wheat that its in the midst of…and its only when both plants produce their seed later before harvest that you can actually tell the difference between the two.

The tares grow right up with the wheat…and since the individual plants…the individual stalks are grouped so closely together, the root system is all tangled up together…doesn’t matter if it’s a good plant or a bad plant…its all mixed up. (pause)

So that being said, in our parable today, once the plants have all sprouted…the wheat and the tares…some of the master’s sharp eyed servants do spot the problem…and they find themselves utterly confused…there’s tares in the wheat…how’d that happen…how’d that lousy seed get mixed in with the wheat…and then they think back to who sowed the field in the first place…the master…and they come to the obvious conclusion…He did this.

And so they march themselves into the house….Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? (pause) They might as well have been asking “What were you thinking?” or “What did you do?” or maybe “Why did you do this?” (pause)

Now I’m gonna stop right there…because I think that this is a pretty common theme…a pretty common question that comes up in the midst of our lives isn’t it? Stop and think about it for a moment. And place yourself in the position of the servants. Somethings going wrong, I think its instinct to blame the highest authority that we can isn’t it? (pause) We do that don’t we? And I’m pretty sure that its isn’t limited to some screw up out in the field is it? (pause)

Earlier this week, I found myself in that position…and it might seem a little odd, but its true. Thursday news broke of the death of a musician about my age…the lead singer of a band that I’ve listened to since my early college days…and it really threw me for a loop…and then a little later on the information came out that it was death by suicide.

And with that in mind I started asking a lot of the same old questions…questions of why and how…and yes I’ll admit it, even the question of Big Guns Upstairs of “why’d you do this? Why didn’t you step in? Why didn’t you stop this somehow?” (pause)

Those are the types of questions that tend to come out in conversation in and around tragic events…and here in our little community we’ve had more than enough events in the past few years that fall in this category…and I’ve heard those same questions from many of you…and while it is important that we recognize the truth that God did not cause these different tragedies to occur, I think it is perfectly acceptable, good even, to cast those questions and emotions and anger and sadness towards God, because God can take it…and if different parst of the Bible like Lamentations and quite a few of the Psalms teach us anything, its that blasting God with these raw emotions of grief is nothing new. (pause)
But at the same time…we also need to recognize that the parable doesn’t stop at that point does it? The servants of the master come at him with questions about the work that he had done, and the master points out the truth…an enemy has done this. (pause) An enemy.

Whether we recognize it or not…there are forces at work in our world that go far beyond our ability to comprehend or see or recognize…and those forces are at work in opposition of the work that God is up to in our reality. God has sown good seed in the field…so these enemies come along stirring up trouble.

Now we can call these enemies a lot of different things…Jesus calls it the devil at one point…but it seems that the powers of darkness and sin and death also fall under that category…they are present in our reality whether we chose to recognize them or not…these powers are here with us…entwined within us…rooted among us.

And perhaps upon recognizing this our reaction is the same as the servants…should we go pull them out? Should we remove that which is evil…that which is bad? (pause) But the master says no…the master tell us to leave it alone…and I think for a couple of different reasons.

Keep in mind…wheat and tares…hard to tell apart…so maybe when Jesus tells us no, he’s posing the question “are you able to judge what good and what’s bad? That’s not your place.”

But secondly…its all mixed up together…and so if you try to remove that which is bad…that which is evil…that which is toxic…you’re going to pull up a bunch of the good shoots as well. (pause) Now admittedly, when I’m in my garden pulling weeds, I don’t bat an eyelash if one of the good plants gets uprooted in the process.  But God?  God won’t risk so much as a single solitary life of that which he has called good…not one.

Why did you do this? (Pause) A common question that we throw God’s direction when this stuff happens…and yet today, perhaps we are receiving a very gentle rebuke as we are reminded that it is not the master who has done this…but at the same time, we are also assured that in the end, the separation of that which God has called good and that which is bad will occur…but its not our job to make it happen…we’re not called to clean the field…we’re called to live in it…or maybe, just maybe, to recognize that we ourselves…ARE…the field.

We profess ourselves to be simultaneously saints and sinners…both at the same time…not 50/50, but 100/100. Fully forgiven and justified saint, and fully twisted and broken and sinful and rebellious…we are both the wheat and the weed…and so maybe just maybe, when Jesus tells us that in the end, that which is considered bad…that which is broken within us will be bound and burned away with fire, leaving behind that which is good and valued and loved by God…and I don’t know exactly how that’s gonna work…but I do remember John the Baptist saying something about Jesus baptizing us with fire…maybe this was what he was talking about.

Now if that’s the case…that’s good news, but its sure not safe news is it? It sounds invasive…harsh…painful even…in short…it sounds a lot like life…and life’s not safe is it? But that doesn’t mean it’s not good.

And so, if you find yourself in a period of life that doesn’t make any sense…when you are asking those big question of Why God, don’t beat yourself up…because sometimes life deals us some pretty lousy cards, and it’s a choice between lousy and lousier…and its in our nature to question it…to react to it…maybe even get mad about it…so we own that…and then we find some grace in it…because the good news tells us that we are not alone it…and throughout all of it…God calls us good.

Amen.

God’s a Lousy Farmer 7-13-14

Today’s sermon was based on Matthew 13:1-9,18-23. This is the parable of the sower.

You can listen to the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/gods-a-lousy-farmer-7-13-14

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here.

Grace and peace to you from God our Father and our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. Amen

Well, its been awhile since we’ve dabbled in the parable department here in worship…but today, the common teaching style of Jesus comes roaring back into the picture doesn’t it?

You may recall from a period last fall when the lectionary and Luke’s gospel served us up week after week a healthy portion of the parable pie…and after a few weeks of it in a row, admittedly I was getting a little tired of it…tired of the repeated need to attempt an interpretation.

But then advent rolled around and we switched gears…not to mention gospels…and thankfully we’ve taken a nice little sabbatical from the parable train…until…this week. That parable of the sower. (pause)

Now admittedly, when I started my preparation last Sunday, taking my first look at the gospel lesson for today…the first thing I saw was “Parable” and I remember thinking “Oh no…here we go again.” But then, I begrudgingly started to read the parable in question…and immediately my mood changed…the parable of the sower. PLANTING…SOIL…FARMING (pause) Considering my background…I might just have a little bit of insight into that.

I am, after all, a farm kid…a graduate of the college of ag at Iowa State University…not to mention happily entrenched in life here among many many farmers in a farming community. Today should be easy right? Let’s do a quick survey shall we?

A sower went out to sow…common translation…springtime planting. Ok..check. (pause) First batch of seeds fell on the path…ummm…let’s see…sounds like a bag of seed corn broke open on the way to the field…maybe it tipped out of the back of the truck on the way…not good…but I get it…so check. (pause) Oh, and the birds came and ate it up…yep..the pheasants get a free meal when that happens…oh and the deer probably show up too. (pause)

Next we hear that seed fell on rocky ground…I get that…all I have to do is think back to the multitude of hours I spent out in the field in early spring with a 5 gallon bucket…picking rock…continuing to add to the mountain that is the rock pile…present in pretty much every single field I’ve ever seen in this part of the country…so check.

After that we hear about seeds falling among the thorns…and then the thorns grow up and choke it…I know all about weeds…anyone ever walked beans mid to late summer…particularly when the cockleburs are particularly strong…I remember chopping my way through patches so thick you couldn’t even see the beans…because they weren’t there…because the burrs crowded them out…so yet again…check.

And finally, we hear that some of the seed fell on good soil and brought forth grain…30, 60, even 100 fold…sounds like countless conversations I’ve had about yield…checking in with dad to see how many bushels he averaged per acre. (pause)

And that’s not all…we can also list countless other things like conversations why the soil on top of the hills is a lighter color than that down in the low spots…time in high school spent studying different profiles in preparation for a soil judging competition…various classes in college where I literally studied soil and all the different aspects of it…time in the greenhouse working with different types of growing media and plants…work for a lawn care company when we needed to analyze the ph balance of the soil to determine the suitability of growing a strong lawn…and finally countless discussions with my wife on just why you call it soil…and not dirt.

It’s safe to say that when it comes to interpretation of today’s parable…I’m all set…and after all, that’s the whole point of parables isn’t? Jesus sharing truth about the kingdom of heaven in ways that the common person can understand…and today…this one’s for us…truth about the kingdom…in rural farm talk. (pause)

And now, this particular parable is one of those oddball ones when Jesus actually takes the time to explain just what he’s talking about isn’t it? We hear the explanation in the second half of today’s lesson…first the parable…then the description…and perhaps as Jesus was describing what each particular soil type refers to…you found yourself nodding along thinking…yah…that all makes sense.

Seed isn’t going to grown on the path or the road is it? Nope…and the birds are going to clean it up pretty quick…and when plants grow among rocks, there is no root and it dries up or pulls out really easily…and when a crops try to grow in a weed patch…you don’t get much crop do you? But the seed that falls in the field…carefully tilled and cared for throughout the growing season…well of course you’re going to get crop out of that. No brainer Jesus. (pause)

But despite the obvious…when we back up to just what Jesus is telling us here, its almost laughable. A sower went out to sow, and as he sowed, seed fell on the path…and on the rocks…and in the thorns…and some, not all by any means…only 25%…managed to fall in the field where its supposed to be. And so it seems that our sower…he’s not very good is he? He doesn’t seem to be paying the slightest attention where he’s throwing that seed…which sort of makes you wonder how much value he places on it doesn’t it?

Think about that for a moment…how much is a bag of seed corn this year? $225…$250? Seems awfully expensive to just take it out and scatter it randomly…with no care as to where it lands. And I don’t know about you…but if I saw someone just open up a bag and give it a toss…not paying the slightest attention to where they were standing…much less trying to keep it in the boundaries and in nice even rows…if I saw that…I’d think it was a pretty lousy farmer…wouldn’t you? Wouldn’t we all judge that farmer pretty harshly? (pause)

But just who is the farmer in the parable? Who is it, that we’re criticizing for their lack of effort in the planting department? Well, when we listen to Jesus’ interpretation, we hear that the seed that is sown…is the word of the kingdom…it’s the gospel…the good news of Jesus Christ…the story of his life and his ministry…and his teaching and his miracles…and his confrontations and his interactions…and finally his violent death on the cross which culminated 3 days later with his glorious resurrection and his defeat over the power of sin and death…that’s the seed.

And if that’s the seed, well then we need to stop for just a moment and think about just who it is that’s throwing that seed to the wind. And as always, we must first recognize that the farmer…the first one to proclaim the work of God within our reality…is God himself…for we have a God that has spoken to humanity in many ways…first through Creation itself…then later on through the law and the prophets…but in these days we have a God that has spoken to us, and is still speaking to us through the Son and through his word in the Bible…God is the farmer…out there scattering the gospel without even paying attention…completely hap-hazardly…apparently letting ¾’s of it go where it has no business what so ever…what a waste right? So I guess God makes for one…lousy…farmer. (long pause)

But you know what? God…isn’t…a farmer…he leaves that to a very special group of people in the world…because God’s got other fish to fry…the seed is the Gospel…we’ve already established that…and so now we need to think about where the Gospel is going…just what are these four types of soil that Jesus talks about in the parable…3 of which seem to waste the gospel and only 1 does anything with it. (pause)
What is the soil? Well…take a look around…you’re looking at it. Each and every person in the world represents that soil…but the important thing to remember, is that we don’t get to choose which one. If we did…that would easy wouldn’t it? We’d all choose to be the good soil and bear fruit for the gospel…some 30…some 60…some 100…but that’s not the reality. (pause) And you know what…if all those soil classes in college taught me anything…its that there is all kinds of different soil everywhere…you take a soil sample, it changes from inch to inch…you look at a plot of land, it is riddled with different soil profiles…all swirled up together…and I think that each and every member of the human race is exactly the same…a swirl of all 4 types of soil…and its not up to us to make any one of the 4 stronger than the others.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again…faith…believing in the gospel of Jesus Christ…it is NOT self generated…it is a gift of the Holy Spirit…it is the result of the Spirit using the proclamation of the gospel to you and creating the root of faith within you. (pause)

When I was working with this text this week, I was surprised to find insight in the original language, which you may know happens to me from time to time…but in the short bit talking about the plants having no root in the rocky soil…the action of “Having” or “Holding” occurs with the seed itself…with the plant…not with the soil. And this strengthens the notion that we do not create faith ourselves because through the Holy Spirit the gospel itself…the seed in our story takes hold of us…and once it does it WILL NOT…let go.

And once that has happened…once God finds the good soil in the life of an individual and faith grows within their life…well, then they join with God…in a different role…that of the sower in Jesus’ story. (pause) As fellow believers in Jesus Christ we join in the priest hood of all believers…and you’ve heard me talk about this before…we all share a calling to proclaim the gospel so that those who have never heard may here…and maybe…just maybe…that seed that we cast out in the name of Jesus Christ…will find good soil and take root.

But at the same time, we must also realize the importance of the example of the sower in today’s story…God himself…the original farmer…and the lousy one at that. (pause)

God doesn’t distinguish where the seed….where the Gospel…goes…he’s equal opportunity…casting that gospel to the wind in abundance and we are called to do the same…it is not up to us to judge the audience that we think is worthy to hear it…if that were the case, then the sower would have stayed inside the boundaries…but that’s not the case…and praise be to God that we are freed of the burden of judging who is worthy to hear the good news and who isn’t…because if that were in fact the case…then in our own lives…in our own history…whoever it was that had joined with God in the role of sower may have taken a look at each one of us and thought…nope…too rocky…and held onto that seed…but if you are sitting here today listening to this message…then you know that’s not the case…and today if you are hearing this for the first time…and I mean really hearing it…well then I think the Holy Spirit’s finding some good soil in you…and who knows how much fruit that’s gonna produce.

Thanks be to God…that God…looks at all of humanity and does NOT distinguish between good soil…and bad soil…thanks be to God…that He…is a lousy farmer…but is a loving Father. Amen.