Posts Tagged ‘Disciples’

Lord Have Mercy 10-28-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 10:46-52, I explore the healing of Blind Bartimaeus. This is Jesus’ final ministry act prior to his Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem which marks the final week of his life. Jesus asks the same question that he posed to his disciples in the previous story. What do you want me to do for you?

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/lord-have-mercy-10-28-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

The grace and peace of the Triune God is yours, now and forever. Amen

I have to say that I am a huge fan of spellcheck…because my spelling is horrendous.  When I’m typing quickly, its super common for me to look up at the screen and see those little red squiggly lines under all kinds of words…because I often tend to spell something phonetically, even when that’s not correct.

This even catches us in today’s lesson…do you think I’m in anyway capable of spelling Bartimaeus correctly?  Its funny though…because the opposite side of things is also true at different times…because sometimes English is hard.  There are some words that I’ve discovered over the years, that trip me up.  Words that I might even use in regular conversation…but when I encounter them on the page…I don’t know what it is.

Now this has happened a lot…but two in particular come to mind.  I was way too old…probably about 7 or 8th grade…before I stopped pronouncing the written word chaos as “chose,” and I was also very sheepish when someone pointed out to me…in my 20’s…that the written word segue was not some random word “seg-you.”

Interestingly enough, we’ve even got one of these words that used to trip me up within our liturgy…most of you are familiar with our flow of worship…how we feature the Brief Order on page 56…but then, typically we move back out of the order of worship found in the hymnal…but the very next thing listed within the traditional liturgy is something called the Kyrie…a call and response, often chanted, portion that sounds like (sing) “In peace let us pray to the Lord…Lord have mercy.”

I grew up with this Liturgy…and the name…kyrie is printed right at the start of this portion…but for many years I looked at it and pronounced it “kie-ree.” And I’m embarrassed to announce that I didn’t learn the correct pronunciation until I was in Seminary.

Now, since we’re talking about this, maybe you’re wondering where the name Kyrie actually comes from…and its from the original language. We sing it in English…but the phrase Lord have mercy comes from the Greek Kyrie Elieson…Kyrie means Lord, and Elieson means have mercy.

Admittedly…this is some of the fancy seminary type stuff that they taught us in school…and I’ve shared before that I’m not overly fond of the big fancy terminology and 50-cent words…so this is one of those things that I learned…but then sorta just tucked in the back of my mind and forgot about.

But then this week I was working with the translation of the gospel text, as I usually do during my background sermon prep work…and I started focusing in on the word for mercy that we hear pop up a couple times…and in looking at that specific word…I realized, once again…my tendency to not connect the phonetics of how a word sounds with how a word looks on the page…until I’d been working with “elieson” for a few minutes…and in another instance of healing from Mark’s gospel…I found a time when Jesus talks about showing mercy…and sharing with others what the Lord has done…and with that, since I have the tendency to think out loud when I’m alone in the office, I said to myself “mercy from the Lord…Lord have mercy…like Kyrie Elieson.” And then the next thought that came spilling out was “duh Scott…you’re a pastor…you really should have known that.” (pause)

Now…all of these thoughts about my personal difficulties with the English language aside…this is an idea that we find within the gospel today…the healing of Blind Bartimaeus. An outcast…a beggar…cast aside to the fringe of society because of his disability…a man who must sit by the roadside…utterly dependent upon the pity of others to throw him a coin or two, in order to survive. But for whatever reason…call it luck or happenstance or serendipity…he happens to be along the way that Jesus is traveling in this last moment before Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem and the final week of his life.

This story concludes the middle section of Mark’s gospel…one that we’ve been in for the past several weeks…a time of transition when Jesus has moved away from his early itinerant ministry around the region…and he’s moving towards the inevitable conclusion in Jerusalem that will culminate on the cross and in the tomb…this central part of the gospel features his teaching and miracles and encounters along the way.

Now interestingly enough…that whole section started off with the healing of another blind man…who the crowds bring to Jesus…and Jesus heals him as well…though that was a bit of an odd situation as Jesus seemingly has to try twice in order to get the healing done correctly…as the first attempt results in the man seeing people walking around looking like trees.

But before we get to the Bartimaeus here at the end of the section…several chapters go by that include events we continue to talk about, even as recently as a week ago…the predictions that Jesus makes about his betrayal and arrest…his torture and execution on the cross, but also the fact that on the third day he will be raised.

We’ve talked about these as we’ve encountered them…and the strange responses that the disciples have had each time Jesus makes the prediction…how their expectations are on display…or their bickering and jockeying for positions of authority and prestige, particularly with James and John a week ago.

Admittedly, I had that moment in mind as I approached this week’s gospel…because there’s a pretty stark overlap between the two stories.  In both stories…the interested party…James and John last week, and Bartimaeus this week…approach Jesus wanting something. And Jesus poses the exact same question both times, because it would seem that he wants them to admit just what it is they want.

What do you want me to do for you?  Now the brothers…they were looking for status…namely an increase for them at the expense of others…but Bartimaeus…well, as we hear from the get-go…he’s looking for something entirely different.

Jesus, Son of David…have mercy on me…and as the people in the crowd try to hush him up…making a quick judgement that he’s not worthy of Jesus’ time or attention…he cries out all the louder…JESUS SON OF DAVID, HAVE MERCY ON ME. (pause)

Mercy…He’s putting it right there on front street…and he’s appealing to one that he believes is able to offer it.  Now with this, Jesus turns his attention to the man…and despite the grumbling going on in the crowd around him…Jesus calls him…here’s another thing we hear multiple times…three times, the “call” of the Lord is offered to Bartimaeus…who jumps up and comes to him.
What do you want me to do for you? Teacher, let me see.  Your faith has made you well…and instantly his eyes are opened…and Bartimaes can see…he’s freed of the thing that has kept him pushed to the margins…the thing that has kept him hindered on the outside…and as we hear…this blind man, follows Jesus along the way.

That’s an important final statement…that Bartimaeus becomes a follower…in fact in Mark’s gospel there’s no more important command that Jesus makes…than the one that we hear over and over again from the Savior…Follow me. Discipleship here in Mark’s gospel means following the one who has called us…following the one who offers mercy to those who are seeking it.

I can’t help but think that’s why Mark placed those two stories right next to each other….especially with the exact same question being asked by Jesus. The repetition to should make us perk up and pay attention. The disciples wanted prestige and didn’t get it…because prestige is not for Jesus to bestow.  But Bart asked for mercy…and it is given to him.

Now as I think about this particular call to follow Jesus…which we can also say is a call into discipleship…I can’t help but think that the Lord calls those seeking mercy…and mercy is received…and maybe Jesus’ final statement to Bart is also telling…your faith has made you well.  Faith…believing that the mercy of the Lord IS offered to you freely…that the promises of the Lord are real and that they are for you.

Now maybe you see where I’m going with this…because as I look down at this font, I’m reminded that in the waters of baptism, we are given a physical representation of this promise of God’s mercy offered to us freely.  In baptism the promises are spoken over us that we have already been claimed by God as beloved children…and that it is made possible the through the action of God in the life death and resurrection of Jesus…that whatever it was that Jesus was accomplishing…its already done.

Baptism is not something that we are doing…its not something that I’m accomplishing as pastor…or the individual is earning or that their parents are achieving on their behalf…the action that happens in Baptism is God’s claim upon the individual, which was made through Christ 2000 years ago…this just gives us something tangible to hold on to in our moments of doubt or fear that we experience at different times in our lives.

And in a few moments, Breckin is going to share in that promise…one made freely by God for all people…as we cry out Lord have mercy…and thanks be to God that the mercy of the Lord is already given. Amen.

This Is Not Normal 10-21-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 10:32-45, I explore Jesus’ final Passion Prediction and the strange way that the disciples continue to react to it. It shouldn’t be normal…and in light of a tragedy in our community, it seems quite fitting.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/this-is-not-normal-10-21-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

The grace and peace of the Triune God is yours, now and forever. Amen

Yesterday I spent I pretty big portion of the day in the car, as my family road tripped up to the central part of the state for the funeral of my wife’s aunt. As we were driving in the morning, both my wife and I commented that it was strange that there weren’t very many farmers out in the field yet…with the mild dry and breezy weather that we’ve had the past few days finally making harvest work a possibility.

But that was the case…very little activity in the fields as we traveled in the morning.  But then on the way home, it was the polar opposite. Combines in almost every field…the tell-tale presence of a large dust cloud as the crops are pulled out…and as we drove along, it crossed my mind “now that’s more like it….this is what I expect to see this time of year…this is normal.” Year after year of history all adds up for us to build these images of normal, as we witness or even experience those things that just end up being common.

Now that being said…I can’t help but think that today’s scripture reveals something else that is starting to become normal. Now, as I mentioned, I included an extra couple of verses in the reading today…because the setting is important.  For the third and final time, Jesus has shared the prediction of his pending passion…his betrayal and arrest…his persecution and torture…his death on the cross…and perhaps most importantly…the good news of the resurrection that he will also experience.

We’ve heard the other two predictions in recent weeks…as all three occur in a fairly brief portion of Mark’s gospel…now here’s the thing.  Jesus doesn’t deviate much in terms of the details that he shares each time…but the thing that’s starting to become familiar…that’s becoming…normal…is the reaction on the part of the disciples.

The first time Peter makes a proclamation that Jesus is the Messiah…and Jesus responds “You betcha…now here’s what that means.” And Peter oversteps his bounds…rebuking Jesus, likely due to an misplaced expectation of just what the earthly Messiah means.

The second time around…Jesus predicts it again…and this time the disciples sorta clam up in front of him, but as they continue walking along they start bickering about who’s the greatest among them…and Jesus has to stop and redirect them again.

And now today…he makes the same prediction for the third and final time…and this time, its James and John who come up to him with this off-the wall request…now…I can’t help but think that they know this probably isn’t the smartest thing to be asking for…so maybe, just maybe they have been paying attention to what happened the first two times…but they come up to Jesus and say “Teacher…we want you to give us whatever we ask of you.” And Jesus…who probably already has a pretty good idea of what’s coming, poses quite the question back at them…What do you want me to do for you?

And with that…we hear this request to hold the places of honor, at the right hand and the left hand of Jesus when he comes into his glory. (pause)
Seriously…its bad enough that the disciples never seem to fully grasp what’s going on…and not only in these three instances…but honestly throughout the course of the gospels it constantly seems like they lack any shred of comprehension…like their boneheaded responses are just the normal thing that we come to expect from them.

But you know what…it shouldn’t be.  These 12 guys…these men who follow Jesus around to witness the ministry first-hand…never seem to get it…and what’s worse…in two out of the three passion predictions…it’s the big 3…Jesus’ inner circle of Peter, James, and John…who misread things…and honestly…the gospel of Jesus Christ…the good news that the kingdom of heaven has come near to us through the incarnate word of God made flesh in Jesus…that’s WAY to big to get brushed off with these boneheaded responses of the disciples…maybe we think its normal…but it shouldn’t be normal. (pause)

Now with this…I need to switch gears…Friday morning, I walked into the office with an expectation in mind…but I was a little off…because as I had taken my kids to school, I had seen and heard several patrol cars as well as the firetruck and ambulance go flying up the hill out of town…and for some reason, the thought went through my head…this is a big one.

Admittedly…I was already a little edgy going into the day…many of you sitting out there probably know the significance of October 19th here in our community…but I sat down at my desk and started working…only to get a message a few minutes later with some of the worst news we can get.

There’s been a car accident…and a student from the high school has been killed…now at this point it was only a rumor…but one that prompted me to reach out to the principal up the hill…and to quickly receive confirmation that yes…that’s what happened…and with that I jumped in the car to go be present and help out at the school in any way that I could.

When I arrived, the students were all in their classrooms…and they were being told what had happened…and as I sat there in the commons, talking with a few of the administration, I knew what I was going to see next.  I was going to see students come back out into the hallways crying…I was going to see them utterly devastated…clinging to one another in the shock…some would continue to walk around the school with that shocked look on their face…some would call their parents and go home…and over the course of the next couple of hours, the school day would continue on as many of them defaulted back into the familiar…upset and shaken…and yet trying their best to go on with things.

And that’s exactly what happened…now here’s the painful thing about this…I knew what to expect…because this isn’t the first time I’ve been at that school when something like this has happened. 3 times in the past 4 years our high school has experienced the tragedy of the death of a classmate…a life lost far too soon…and this should not be normal.

(pause) Now please don’t think that I’m trivializing this in anyway…its heart breaking…utterly devastating…and I know enough of those kids up the hill to feel the anguish of having been through this, not just once, and not twice, but now three times.  And to know that as devastating as it might be for the school and the community…that there is a family who has now experienced the nightmare that you don’t wish on anyone.

And if you have heard the news report about the accident…you know how bad this is without me needing to say it…and I’ve had conversations with several different people in the meantime…conversations that pretty much end up saying “this doesn’t make sense?” or “I want to know why?” And usually once they say that, they follow it up with “and I know I can’t know, and that’s not right.”

There’s a lot of truth in that…when a tragedy like this happens…something that we can’t make heads or tails of…it usually leaves us with a bitter taste in our mouths…and we’re either really sad or we’re really angry…and often we look for someone or something to aim that emotion at.

And as we consider that…maybe, just maybe…Jesus response to James and John is fitting today…what do you want me to do for you? The quick answer…is that we want God to take it away…to snap his fingers and make it just a bad dream that didn’t actually happen…but our broken reality has also shown us that this is not what’s going to happen…because Jesus did not come into our reality in order to serve as something of a magic lamp…to grant wishes to us…I can only think that Jesus had something much bigger and more profound in mind, not only as he predicted his passion…but as he actually experienced it.

Because in the life and the death and the resurrection of Jesus…God was doing something about this broken reality that we live in…a reality that includes pain and suffering and death…whatever it was that Jesus was accomplishing…the promise of the gospel assures us that whenever death rears its ugly head…it doesn’t get the last word…God does…because God mourns this reality just like we do…and God knows that while it might feel normal…it shouldn’t.

This is the gospel…that while we were sinners, Christ died for us…and this is true whether we feel good about it or not.  I don’t know about you…but in light of this tragic death…just like the others like it that our community has experienced…sometimes these promises of the gospel feel kinda bitter…but the truth is that the promises don’t change based on how we feel. (pause)
Once more, our community has experienced a tragedy…and now together, we will all try our best to find the new normal going forward…and as we do, whether this feels trite right now in the moment, or if it is a comfort…we have a God who is walking this road with us…a God who has promised to never forsake us even in the times when we find ourselves hollering and screaming at him…God will take it…so if that’s what you need to do…if that’s what you need to feel…feel it, and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

This is not normal…nor should it be…but regardless of how we find ourselves feeling right here, right now…know that God doesn’t think its normal either…and even if it doesn’t feel like it, God HAS already done something about it. Amen.

That Was Stupid 9-30-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 9:38-50, I explore the human tendency to do or say foolish hurtful things. And yet, we are still claimed and loved by God. This manifests in our Baptism.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/that-was-stupid-9-30-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Holy Trinity. Amen

How many of you have ever said something…and the instant it came out of your mouth you just knew…that was stupid. (pause) It happens doesn’t it? Even without meaning to. Maybe we crack a joke. Maybe we say something that seems perfectly on point in our minds…but the second it comes out of our mouths the reaction of the other person clues us into the reality of our folly.

Would it surprise you to hear that…even I…have been guilty of this? (pause) Shocking though that might be? I, too, have fallen victim to what can best be called “open mouth, insert foot” syndrome.  To be honest…it has probably happened way more often that I should admit. I’ve said stupid stuff to my wife.  I’ve said stupid stuff to my kids.  I’ve said stuff to my friends and colleagues…and I’ve said stuff to some of you out there.

It’s a bad feeling isn’t it? When you say something stupid…but when it happens, perhaps the only thing we can do, once we recognize our stupidity…is to own it and ask for forgiveness. (pause)

Now based on the number of you that were brave enough to raise your hands or nod when I asked that initial question…maybe we can take a bit of comfort in knowing that we aren’t alone in this regard…and if the scriptures are to be believed…we are in good company. (pause)
We actually hear two different examples of this very thing…as people who should really know better start squawking about stuff.  The first one happens in the first lesson from Numbers…Moses, having grown tired of the excessive complaints aimed in his direction from the people, is given a bit of a reprieve when God appoints 70 elders and sends down the Holy Spirit upon them to prophesy…but apparently 2 guys, Eldad and Medad…coolest names in the Old Testament if you ask me…don’t quite follow the correct procedure…leading Joshua to start tattling…My Lord Moses stop them….Joshua…as in Moses’ second in command…as in the guy who takes over as leader when Moses dies…as in the guy who actually leads the people into the Promised Land…he tattles about these two prophets who are doing it wrong…and Moses pretty much says “So what?  I wish the Lord would send the Spirit upon all the people.”  Cue the thought for Joshua “Well, that was stupid.”

(pause) Now the second time happens in the gospel lesson…and for once, its not Peter who spouts off…this time around, its John…the beloved disciple of Jesus…one of the big 3…one of his inner circle…Lord…we saw someone casting out demons in your name…but he wasn’t following us so we tried to stop him.”  I bet John was feeling all high and mighty…having established dominance over this would be do-gooder…What a let down it must have been to hear Jesus say “So what? He’s doing good…leave him alone.” Funny enough John, along with his brother James, the other member of the big 3, are gonna say something stupid again not long after this.  2 times we hear John speak…and both times Jesus calls him on the carpet…I can only imagine that both times he thought “Man…that was stupid.”

But what are we to make of these moments? That even these important individuals would say something stupid…something foolish…something they thought was on point, only to be reminded that when God acts…its rarely in ways that we expect or anticipate.  And yet…in these moments of God’s action…it pretty much always seems to center around flawed people who can, and often do…make mistakes…people who make foolish decisions…people who are broken.

This is a theme that is emerging within the confirmation class as we make our way through the Biblical narrative…a theme that we’ve talked about here in worship before…that we have a God who takes action within our reality…and uses broken people to do it.

Name anyone from the scriptures…minus Jesus…and we find flaws. Adam and Eve…no brainer.  Noah, a drunk. Abraham, a lying trickster. Moses, a murderer. David, an adulterer, Solomon, an idolater. Peter, James, and John…Paul…the list goes on and on…and yet…these are the people that God chooses to continue moving this crazy thing called reality forward.  Its both incredible humbling…as well as reassuring to see what God can accomplish through imperfect people.

Reassuring perhaps…because in these ongoing stories we are reminded that God has made the choice to continually seek out and bless flawed, imperfect, broken people…and that includes us.

You’ve probably heard me talk about this before…maybe I even sound like a broken record…but if there is one truth that we can take from the scriptures and the way that they interact with our experience in our own lives…its that we each hold the capacity for good and bad…we all have the capability to love and create…or to hate and destroy…something that was certainly on display throughout the course of our news cycle in this past week.

It never ceases to amaze me to witness the ugliness that comes around when our partisanship is on display…and I’m not just talking about Washington and Supreme Court Nomination Hearings…I’m also talking about the way that we respond to it…the way we tear into the other side…that we demonize those who disagree with us…the way that our minds are made up and our biases confirmed within our personal reaction to what happens…

And here’s the things…people are watching us…our kids are watching us…our neighbors are watching us…and I wonder what they see. (pause) Jesus makes an interesting statement in today’s gospel…and keep in mind that this is a direct continuation of what we heard last week…when Jesus places a little child in the midst of the disciples, and then gathers that child into a bear hug…our lesson today starts off with John’s bonehead statement…but Jesus is still holding onto that child. That hasn’t changed.

And he says “if any of you put a stumbling block before one of these little ones, you might as well tie a giant millstone around your neck and throw yourself in the ocean.” (pause) Now that stumbling block…that comes from the Greek word Scandalezio…which sounds an awful lot like scandal…and Jesus goes on from there with some rather startling words about our hands or feet or eyes causing scandals and if they do we should cut them off.

Think about that…if you cause a scandal to one of these little ones who’s watching you…learning from you…learning from your example…and they leave or fall away from the faith because of what you say or do…throw yourself in the ocean…or worse yet you might find yourself cast into a burning trash-heap that never stops smoldering. (pause)

These are sobering words…difficult words…teachings that should really give us pause as we hear them from the one we call the Christ…because I can’t help but think how universal they are. We’ve all done or said or thought something that we instantly knew was stupid or hurtful or false…something that in one way or another destroys a relationship…either between us and another person, or us and ourselves…or even between us and our maker. Its universal…and if you don’t think so, you’re lying to yourself.

This is why our liturgy includes the same opening portion every single time…and why we introduce it in the very same way…as we gather for worship on this day we know that there are things in our lives that stand in the way of our relationship with our maker…and then we confess it.

But the glorious part of the liturgy is what comes next…because we invoke the name of Jesus…the very same thing that mysterious exorcist John was talking about was doing…and in Jesus’ authority, we declare to one another the entire forgiveness of all of our sins…and in this we are assured that the one who has made us has come near to us once again.

And there’s another thing that we do that embodies this same promise…that the one who made us has claimed us and that the brokenness that is a part of each and every one of us will NOT stand in the way…and that is the waters of baptism…when we are named and claimed as God’s beloved children…something that we remember and cling to each and every day of our existence…daily dying to sin and rising a new creation though the confession and repentance of sin…an embodiment of the promise and the action made on our behalf by God…which in just a few moments Callan Teten will also experience. And that is worth celebrating…and its worth remembering…because in the waters of his baptism, Callan, like every other individual who has come before him, will join as a part of this assembly…one part of the greater body of Christ…made of up of broken and flawed…and yet loved and accepted people…and like each of them, he’ll be watching you…learning from you…witnessing how we, as followers of Christ can be different in this broken world.  May we each take that seriously…clinging to the promises made on our behalf by the one who was willing to take on flesh to show us all…that despite our ability to be stupid…we are loved anyway. Amen.

Who Is Called Greatest 9-23-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 9:30-37, I explore Jesus’ second passion prediction, and the way that it leads to expectations of personal greatness and prestige. Jesus is up to something different.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/who-is-called-greatest-9-23-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

Over the course of the past couple of years, I have gotten into the habit of watching tv shows that focus in on life in the political spectrum. I’ve made our way through several different series, the most notable being The West Wing.

It was a great show that zeroed in on the lives of several of the prominent senior staff that surrounded the President of the United States in the hectic day to day activity of the White House. The show ran for 7 seasons, and a pretty major feature of the final season was the presidential race that would culminate in the final episode with the inauguration of the new president and the subsequent change over in staff from the old faces to the new ones.

In one of the final scenes, the new senior staff walks into the West Wing and they all pause for just a moment, before pealing off in different directions to find their new offices…and in one instance, we see the overlap as the outgoing character picks up his belongings…shakes the hand of the new guy…and then stands there for a brief moment watching as the new guy sets down his stuff…and excitedly begins arranging his new office.

It makes me think of the expectations that this character must be feeling…the ideas of what things will be like in this new role…of the work that he’ll be doing…whether he’s accurate in his assumptions or not. (pause)

Now the theme of expectations is one that we keep bumping into here over the course of several chapters of Mark’s gospel, including today’s lesson.  There’s a stretch of Mark that features several different teachings from Jesus that appear difficult…unexpected…maybe even a little harsh…teachings that maybe, just maybe make it difficult to even want to be a follower of Christ…some of these teachings or themes are unique…and others pop up more than once.

We’ve mentioned before that when something repeats itself within the scriptures…its usually worth paying attention to…and if you happened to be here last week, you might have noticed something that sounds familiar.  For the second time…Jesus predicts his upcoming betrayal and arrest…he predicts his suffering and death…and he predicts that three days later he’ll rise again…its nearly identical to what we heard back in chapter 8…and funny enough…it would seem that 2 times isn’t sufficient…because a chapter later…in a passage that we’ll encounter a couple more week’s from now…Jesus is going to do it a third time.

3 times he shares this prediction with the disciples…this honest and open revelation of his eventual fate…of how things are going to culminate at the end of his ministry. (pause) Now, the disciples’ reaction today is interesting…we hear that they lack understanding of just what Jesus is talking about…and even though they want to ask him questions…they remain silent.

Maybe, just maybe they are remembering the last time Jesus brought this whole deal up…and Peter getting a little testy with Jesus before getting a verbal smack-down. Maybe that’s why they dummy up and don’t ask the questions that are clearly on their minds…not even Peter in this instance.

But instead…as they continue walking along towards Capernaum…their conversation takes a turn…and they start bickering. Now maybe their debate has something to do with Jesus’ prediction…but maybe it has something to do with this location as well. It seems a little specific to name that they are in Capernaum…unless we know a little something about this community on the northern edge of the Sea of Galilee.

Capernaum was an important city in those days. It was located right along a major trade route…it was also a boundary between two different territories and as such it was a taxation point.  The Roman government and military both had a presence there…and the residents, Jews and Romans alike, benefitted from all this with wealth and affluence.  It was a place of prestige…of authority and influence…in short…this was a place a power…and I’m guessing, as this merry band of Christ followers approached the city with words about this Messiah walking in their midst, the topic of authority and power seemed pretty important. (pause)

Now once they get into town and settle into one of the homes there, Jesus starts asking some questions…namely what they’d been bickering about…because it seems that their conversation escalated into an argument over which one of them would be called the greatest…who would hold the most authority…who’s the most important among them. (pause)
I can’t help but think that this starts to reveal a little bit of similarity in the expectations the disciples hold with what we heard out of Peter a week ago.  Jesus, you are the Messiah…and Jesus says yes, now let me tell you what that means…and Peter says No lord…the Messiah cannot be killed…you’ve got important political work to accomplish…take back the throne…free us from oppression, bring about this kingdom of heaven that you keep talking about…obviously you can’t do that if you’re dead. (pause)

It’ll be the same sort of thing when we encounter the last Passion prediction too…Jesus shares what will happen…and two of the disciples hit him up with a request to sit at his right hand and his left when he comes into power.

And today…same deal…Hey guys…Jesus is talking all that Messiah stuff again…I don’t know why he’s so set on the idea that he’s gonna die…I don’t know what that’s all about…who knows…maybe he’s being metaphorical…but you know what…when he takes control…its gonna be awesome…and we’ve been following him around…I wonder what spot we’ll each get.

That’s the debate…Jesus is here to bring about something UTTERLY new…a new way to live…a new way to be in this world…claimed and loved by God…and freed from the power of the brokenness that is still so prevalent…and in the midst of all this…the disciples are bickering over what cabinet position they are going to hold “in the kingdom.” Of who’s gonna be second in command…of who will hold more authority or prestige or status.

3 times Jesus tells them plainly. (slowly) I am going to die and rise again. It will be brutal, it will be painful, and you will all abandon me…and in three different ways, they reveal the same thing. What can we get out it? (pause)

I wonder…do we fall in the same trap? Do we get caught up in human expectations over what Jesus is going to do for us…of how we’re going to benefit from this identity as a follower of Christ? (pause) Is that how we look at our association with the congregation…or our identity and position within the greater community because of our membership here in the local faith institution? Do we wonder…or even seek out…the self-image of being called great? (pause)

That’s the rub in the disciples debate…they are arguing over who will be the one to be called…or named great.  Funny enough, they know better…because when Jesus calls them on it…they don’t say a word…its almost like they’ve already figured out that this isn’t what Jesus is all about…and yet it’s the issue most important to them.

Maybe its because the world works that way…their society was not that different from ours in that regard.  Power and influence and prestige and authority and fame and glory and riches were the currency of the day…just as they are now.

But Jesus proposes something different doesn’t he? It is not these things that will make your name great…you will not be called great because of these things…you want to be called great…welcome the least of these.  And he places a child in their midst.

Now in Jesus’ day, children were the lowest of the low on the status ladder…lower even than slaves…but Jesus could have also grabbed a begger…or a lepper…or a foreigner or a tax collector.  Anyone who their society dictates was unacceptable…Jesus says put them before yourself…serve them…and then you’ll be called great. (pause)

I’m drawn to that idea of being called great…maybe its subjective, because depending on the moment we might call a lot of things or people great…but Mark’s gospel really doesn’t. In fact…there are only two times when this exact phrase is used…to be called great…this is one…and the other is when Jesus answers the question of what commandment can be called the greatest.

Anyone remember how he answers?  Love God and Love your neighbor as yourself.  Place others ahead of you…that’s what Jesus calls great. (pause) But maybe, just maybe that doesn’t compute. Because this is an idea that is so utterly foreign in a dog eat dog world…a world where we have to look out for number 1…a world where we bite and claw our way to the top…but I always wonder…where does that get us?

There’s an old saying “the one who dies with the most toys wins” (pause) but there’s another saying that refutes it “the one who dies with the most toys still dies.” It’s a sober reminder that this life has an expiration date. (pause)

But…Jesus is doing something different…utterly different. This kingdom of heaven…whatever the heck that means…its different…it doesn’t focus in on power or authority or prestige or status.  None of those things that the world tells us you have to have in order to be complete will actually get you there.  But a promise that there is something more…that you have been claimed by the one who created you…that you are loved and accepted and treasured as you are right now…and that no matter what happens that everlasting love will not be taken away from you and not even death can get in the way of it.  That promise gives us hope to cling to in the midst of all the mess of this world that we are constantly surrounded with and bombarded by.

Trust me…there is plenty of stuff in this world that can drown us in despair…and there are plenty of times when that hope of the promise might just be really hard to see…and this is why we need one another…to reflect that light of life that Christ has brought into this world…to shine that light so those stuck in darkness have something to look to…to be the hands and feet of Christ, even in some tiny way…just to show this world that no matter how hard it rants and raves…and no matter how loudly it screams that might makes right…or that gaining just a little more and a little more at the expense of another will make you satisfied…no matter how hard the powers of darkness in this world rave that light WILL shine brighter…because when light shines darkness loses…that’s the simple fact of the matter…even when it doesn’t feel like it. (pause)

The future is unknown to us…we might have our plans or expectations…we might have our hopes and our dreams…but the reality might turn into something completely different.  May we find hope in the one thing that will remain constant…God’s promises for you have already been made real in the life and the death and the resurrection of Jesus Christ. That’s something that we can call great.  Amen

Who Am I 9-16-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 8:27-38, Jesus poses a question “Who do you say that I am?” Its a big question, and a difficult one to answer. And yet its worth pondering on.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here: (note this looks differently than simply listing the link as in past postings…listen by clicking the orange play button in the top left corner).

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

A few days back I had a conversation with an old friend…and we got to talking about the irony of cell phones.  Pretty much everyone walks around with a phone in their pocket these days…which means that it should be incredibly easy to get a hold of each other.

And yet…no one answers their phone do they? Maybe we can blame it on caller id…when the phone rings…if its not someone’s name, or a number that we recognize…we let it go to voice mail don’t we? This was what my friend and I were discussing…and in the midst of this discussion she said “You know, its probably the telemarketers fault.”

She said it in passing…but that statement stuck with me long after the conversation was over…and it made me think back to my younger years, before everyone had a cell phone…when we’d answer the old landline at the house…and that coupled with remembering countless conversations with telemarketers…calls that would go along these lines…Hello…a long pause while the robo-dialer connected on the other end…and then…Hello…is this Mr DaHlen? (cringe and hang up the phone).

It was in this moment that I recognized a pretty major pet-peeve…I hate it when names get mispronounced…an issue that happens with my last name with a LOT of regularity. I’ll be honest, I don’t really know why this bugs me so much…but it does…it feels like the person calling me by name really doesn’t know me…and vice-versa in the times when I’m the one doing the mispronunciation, it probably feels the same way to them……and I can only think that it points to a sense of unfamiliarity…a lack of understanding…or relationship…whether intentional or not…its just not a good feeling.

And I can’t help but think that this sense is present in our gospel for today…this lack of understanding or familiarity…and Jesus is still making the rounds during his ministry prior to his intentional turn towards Jerusalem and what will ultimately culminate in his death.

We are right about the half-way point of Mark’s gospel with where we pick things up today. And it would seem that Jesus thinks its about time to check in and see what people are saying…and so, as he walks around with his myriad of followers in tow, he asks the simple question.  Who do people say that I am?

The disciples respond with the various chatter that they’ve heard. Some call him John the Baptist…others Elijah or one of the prophets…and none of these are really out of line…his ministry and his message certainly have similarities with these different figures who came before in Israel’s history.

But Jesus apparently isn’t satisfied with this answer…because maybe its not enough to simply explore what people in general are saying…and so he gets a little more personal, particularly with the 12 disciples as he asks Who do YOU…say that I am?

I can’t help but think that this is a good question…an important one…and one that the disciples should really be able to answer by this point. They’ve been following Jesus for a while…clearly they’ve formed a solid connection and relationship…they’ve seen the miracles and listened to his teaching time after time after time…if anyone should have insight into just who Jesus is, its them.

And as we hear…Peter takes his normal role as spokesman with a divinely inspired response…you are the Messiah…the Christ…God’s anointed one. Peter is the first person to give Jesus this name…this identity…and Peters not wrong…but he is still in error.

Because as soon as Jesus starts to reveal to them what it means to be THE Messiah, Peter starts squawking…rebuking Jesus…which leads Jesus to start some pretty major rebuking of his own…Get behind me Satan…you have your mind set not on divine things…but on human things. (pause)

Here’s the rub. Sometimes I sorta feel bad for Peter when I come across this story…of course he’s got his mind on human things…he’s human…just like we are. So come on Jesus…maybe tone it down with calling him Satan…that seems a little on the harsh side. (pause)
And yet…its worth noting that Peter’s expectations of the Messiah, whatever they point to…are off.  It stands to reason that his expectation is more of a political figure.  The kings of old were anointed to be rulers…and prophecy had stated that the Messiah would again sit on David’s throne.  All signs probably pointed him in this direction…and Peter’s own experience with Jesus might have pointed that way too…somehow he’s made this assumption…although it would seem, based on Jesus’ response…that Peter is unfamiliar with just what the truth is of Jesus’ identity as the Messiah.

Now, all else aside…I can’t help but think of the magnitude of this question from Jesus in the first place. Who do you say that I am? (pause) I don’t think he’s merely posing this question to 12 dudes who followed him around for 3 years prior to his execution on the cross…but I think this is a question that Jesus poses to each one of us…and it’s a hard question.  Who do you say that I am?

I think this is a hard question because our answer not only reveals something about how we think of God…but it also reveals something about us doesn’t it? Think about that question and how you would answer it.  Is Jesus just some wise 1st century Jewish rabbi?

Is he someone who showed up to tell the religious elite that they were doing it wrong?  Is he just some nice guy in a story that may or may not be true? (pause) Or if we go with the title assigned to him today…what does it mean that he’s the Messiah? What does the anointed one of God mean?

What are some of the other names or titles that we use when we think of Jesus? Lord…the lamb?  Emmanuel. God…the Son…savior, teacher, friend?  These are just a few of the various titles that we can and do apply to the one who our faith is named after. But I wonder, do any of them really do justice…or is Jesus, God in human form…the all-powerful creator of the universe made man…simply too big for any of us to wrap our limited understanding around…even though we try to do just that on a pretty regular basis.

The thing is…every time we try to assign meaning or identity or whatever we want to call it…all we pretty much end up doing is placing God in a box…even if that particular box might be an aspect that’s true…we can not begin to limit God to anything that we can come up with…because our assumptions, no matter how good our intentions…will always…fall…short.

I really doubt that Peter had poor intentions when he pulled Jesus aside to dispute the very notion that the Messiah would suffer and die at the hands of the religious and politically powerful…much less to suffer the utter indignity of the cross…a cursed death intended to be a brutal example of what would happen to you if you opposed the Roman government.

And yet…this is the reality of Jesus…and what does that reveal to us? That maybe, just maybe the Messiah is one who will ALWAYS align himself with those who are marginalized…those who the powerful say are unacceptable or even less than human…and that not only will Jesus be found with them…he will love them…and will show us, time and time again that there is another way to live in this broken and yet wonderful world that we have been given.

Maybe the Messiah is the one to show us that there is a way that we can chose to love one another and treat everyone as a fellow human being, regardless of social standing or status…but that’s a challenge to those whom society deems to be the powerful…and those with the illusion of power will often do anything to hold onto it…and this is why Jesus died.

Because in the life of Jesus, the one called the Messiah, God was showing us that there is another way…and that we can live in harmony with the world around us…and those that we share it with…and even with the one who made it…and the world…said…no. The cross, tame as it has become for us over the course of 2000 years of history and separation…the cross was a BRUTAL answer to the new way of life that God was showing us, something we call the kingdom of heaven…but the cross wasn’t the last word…because 3 days later he rose again to show us that not even death can silence the love of God that is actively breaking through into our reality. (pause)

Now I need to back up just a bit…and come back around to Peter…because I still think its harsh to consider Jesus’ response…Get behind me Satan…but its worth noting that Jesus doesn’t say Get away from me…he simply says get back in line behind me…and Satan is simply a Greek word for an adversary…so he isn’t actually calling Peter the devil here…Jesus is telling Peter that he needs to come back behind Jesus…and keep following him…even if that leads to the torment and torture of the cross.

Peter didn’t have the whole story yet…because he hadn’t seen the resurrected Lord…the living Lord who is a physical example that not even death can beat the good news that God has brought into our realty. Maybe Peter was singing a different tune once Easter rolled around and he saw things first hand.

And here’s the thing that we have in common with Peter…even with the benefit of hindsight…we don’t have the full picture yet either. Yes Jesus is alive…yes the tomb is empty…yes it is finished…and yet, we still view all of this through our limited human understanding.

But there will come a day when we will see these things clearly…a day which has been promised by the very one who lived and died and rose again in the first place…and in the meantime we live in hope and expectation of that day, and not only that…but we live out each day as if it is true…whether we can wrap our heads around it or not.

Jesus asks us…Who do you say that I am? (pause) It’s a big question that we need to continue to ask ourselves…and as we do so, let us each continue to follow the one who makes the promises to us…for that is our place in our identity as followers of Christ…we follow behind him, whether we really get it or not. Amen

You Are Doing It Wrong 9-2-18

In this sermon, based on Mark 7:1-8, 14-15, 21-23, I explore a debate that Jesus engages in that focuses in on the practices that are acceptable (or not) to God. From here we move into the idea that encounters with the divine through worship look or sound or seem a whole lot different to different people.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/you-are-doing-it-wrong-9-2-18

You can follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

Many of you out there know I’m a fan of movies…and that I often make comparisons between them and the scriptures. I suppose you could say that movie acts as a bit of a parable in these instances…and today is no different.

I’m remembering one that came out back in the early 90’s…a movie called Backdraft that focused on 2 brothers who were 2nd generation firefighters in Chicago…the movie opens with a flashback…as the brothers are young…and together they are trying to put on the gear that firefighters utilize for their protection as they battle the blazes…and the younger brother is trying to get the heavy fire-resistant coat buttoned up correctly…his older brother takes one look…and in the condescending way that older brothers often have tells him “You’re doing it wrong” and promptly buttons it up for him.

Now this moment repeats a little later on in the movie, when the brothers, now fully grown and assigned to the same fire station, set off on the first fire for the younger brother, who has just graduated from training…and as they get off the truck, he’s still struggling to button up his coat correctly…and sure enough…once again, big brother, takes over…and buttons him as he says…You’re doing it wrong.

The moment repeats itself one more time at the end of the movie…when the younger brother…who now has lot of experience, is sitting in a truck across from another newbie, experiencing the same problem…and it comes full circle as he leans across to help the new guy after saying…You’re doing it wrong. (Pause)

This repeating moment speaks to a sense of unfamiliarity…of needing to learn the right way of doing things…and it also points us in the direction of certain things that must be done in a certain way…and while firefighting might not have much in common with worship…I had a professor in seminary that reminds me a lot of those two brothers. He was tasked with teaching us the “proper etiquette” for leading worship…and believe me the guy took it seriously…

I remember the way he would correct us in worship lab…yes we had a lab about worship, crazy as that sounds…he was always kind…but he would point out when you did something wrong…like lifting the bread incorrectly during the words of institution…or adding in the phrase “in the name of the father and the son and the holy spirit” in a moment when you aren’t supposed to…or the way you hold your arms during the prayers of intercession. If we messed up, we’d hear that same phrase…you’re doing it wrong.

Now…this is evidence of something we call High Church or Low Church…and its essentially talking about the traditions of worship. There are some congregations and pastors who are extremely high church…they wear ALL the vestments…and they follow very distinct rules about things…rules as tedious as which candle you light on the alter first…and whether or not you should lift the offering plates towards heaven before placing them on the altar.

And then on the flip side there’s the low church mentality…one that doesn’t always put a ton of stock in the “right way” of doing things. You might call it laid back…any guesses on which side I fall? (pause)

Here’s the thing…these different practices…different methods or ways of doing things effect how worship looks and sounds and functions…and yet it raises the question…is there a right way and a wrong way? Or are there simply different ways to worship?

And that seems to be the question being hotly debated by Jesus and some of the religious elite in today’s passage. We hear that the Pharisees and Scribes are criticizing Jesus because his disciples don’t go through a ceremonial handwashing before they eat…thereby risking their unclean hands making the food unclean and therefore making them unclean when they eat it.  That’s the initial controversy…and since they are his disciples…clearly they must have learned this behavior from him…and therefore, he gets targeted.

But maybe you’re wondering why this is a big deal…well in the Jewish culture…there is great importance about being ritually clean or unclean…and it goes all the way back to Moses and the law…and it serves a variety of purposes. These were God’s chosen people…and God willingly dwelled among them…but since God is perfect…since God is utterly clean, God cannot tolerate anything or anyone coming near that is unclean…and there have been countless rules and regulations developed to ensure the proper fashion of things…that the proper worship of the divine is happening.

And this rule is one them…but funny enough, Mark has embellished things just a bit by saying that ALL the Jews follow this law…because in actually, even in Jesus time, this particular rule about ritual washing of hands only applied to the priests.

Now Jesus makes a point of this…actually several times over, and in some of the verses that we skip over today, he makes a heck of a point about food being unable to defile…or to make a person unclean…when he reminds his audience that food goes in the stomach and comes out…into the sewer…think about that for a moment and maybe you’ll make the connection of just what Jesus thinks about this whole contraversy.

But there’s also another statement that Jesus makes…one that really caught my attention, as he quotes from the prophet Isaiah…He says “in vain do they worship me.” (pause) In vain.

I thought about that a lot…because at first glance it sorta seems like this prophetic word of the Lord is a bit troublesome…saying that worship is in vain…I mean, God might as well be saying that worship is pointless…that it serves no purpose…that there’s no reason for it…and if that’s all we hear, that’s troubling.

But we’ve got to stop and consider what Jesus is really talking about here. One thing we need to remember is just how utterly connected the Jewish culture is with their religion, and their worship practices…far more than we are in within our own faith tradition…but for the Jewish people, even the what they ate was tied to worship and could effect it.

And so when the Pharisees accuse Jesus and the disciples of eating with unclean hands…of being defiled…of being unacceptable…they are essentially saying that if you don’t do it this way…then God will not hear you…God will not see you…or on the flip side that if you do not approach God in this way then you do not approach God.

And when I start to hear things like that, I get a little nervous…because it seems to indicate that worshipping God…that experiencing the divine comes with an owner’s manual…and that there’s a checklist to it all…that God can only be found in this specific box…but if the scriptures tell us anything, its that God will not be contained…God will not be found in a box…and if the life death and resurrection of Jesus shows us anything…its that there is no length that God will not go in order to encounter us. (pause)

Now…as I say this…maybe you’re sitting out there thinking about the traditions and the rituals that are important to you…those aspects of worship or prayer or quiet time or reflection…those aspects that have become vital for you…and not only that, but they have become life-giving for you because you experience the divine within them.

I’ll never forget the time, very early on in my experience of leading worship at a tiny country church near where I lived…and I dove right into the liturgy, but skipped over the Brief Order which we also use here every week…and they stopped me…and I had to go back and do that…because for that congregation…for that small gathering of believers…that moment of confession and the announcement of forgiveness is vital. And its not my intention to say that those things are not important.

But what I will is this…that thing that is vital to a divine encounter with God…that looks different for different people or different groups or different denominations.  God shows up in many mysterious ways…some of which might trip your trigger…some of which just seem odd or foreign…and maybe even prompt to think “you’re doing it wrong.”

But thanks be to God that God shows up…because when God shows up…hearts are changed…and that’s the point of this whole deal…and I believe this is what Jesus is talking about as he reminds us that it is not what goes into the body that defiles…but what comes out…because what comes out is a reflection of the heart that lies within us…a heart that can and does reflect the light of life…but can and does reflect the brokenness of the world…brokenness that manifest itself in these different traits that Jesus talks about…attitudes or behaviors that hinder our relationship with God and with our neighbors…these evil things come from within. (pause)

But remember…God shows up…and somehow, someway, we have a God who changes hearts…and our amazing God does this out of a perfect, all in, love for each and every one of us…there is nothing that you can do or say or think that will make God love you any more…and there is nothing that can make God love you any less…and this is the promise which has been made real for us through the resurrection of Jesus Christ…when God shows us that there is no box…not even a tomb…that can contain the divine from showing up among God’s people.

We all worship a little different…but the one that we worship is the same…and when you encounter the divine, in whatever way is meaningful for you…in whatever way touches your heart…God will never say You’re doing it wrong. Amen.

Now I Have Heard Everything 7-29-18

In this sermon, based on John 6:1-21, I explore two miraculous signs of Jesus, and how they remind us that God is with us even in the midst of terrifying events.

You can listen to the audio of the sermon here:
https://soundcloud.com/revdalen/now-i-have-heard-everything-7-29-18

You can also follow along with the text of the sermon here:

Grace and peace to you in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit. Amen

My late grandfather had a habit, or maybe we can call it a ritual…one that started up about the time that he took on the status of “semi-retired farmer.”  About 10:30 every weekday morning, he’d head into town and pull up a chair with several of the other semi-retired farmers at the local watering hole. They’d each have a cold one and they’d share the news of the day…and once they’d solved all the world’s problems for another 24 hours…they’d trickle out and head home for lunch.

Now, maybe you’ve got a ritual kind of like this…a gathering place or even just a group of people that you swap the news with…those big stories that have caught your attention…those unexpected events that make you say “well now I’ve heard everything.”

I can’t help but think that with our 24 hour news cycle and the myriad of information available at our fingertips at any given moment, that’s probably a statement that we make with a fair bit of regularity…we hear something crazy…for instance I just read an article this week about a drug sniffing dog in Columbia that is so good at its job that the cartels have literally placed a bounty on its head…I can’t lie, I read that article and literally said it. “Now I’ve heard everything.” But I also know that in another day or two, something new and unexpected will happen…and I’ll probably say it again.

Now pondering along these lines…I find myself wondering if the same sort of conversations were happening about 2000 years ago around Israel…as people sat around talking about the events of the day…which I’m guessing they did…word of mouth conversations were the C-Span of the day after all…and so I wonder just what those conversations might have sounded like…

Hey man…you’re not gonna believe this. But I heard there was this wedding in Cana…and get this…part way through the wedding, they ran out of wine…and there was this random guy with a bunch of friends there…and his mom was there too…and when she heard they were out of wine, she went and told him…and he looked over at this huge water jars that they use for washing up, and he told them to take some out and give it to main dudes…and they did and it was wine…guy turned water into wine.  Woah…now I’ve heard everything.

But then like a week later they were talking again…Hey man, you know what I heard about that guy with the wine? I heard he’s been walking all over the place…like, healing diseases, and casting out demons, and I guess he was doing it down in Jerusalem during the Passover and he even threw a giant ruckus in the temple at one point. Woah…NOW I’ve heard everything.

Wouldn’t you know it…next time these guys get together…they start talking again. Hey man, you remember that guy we were talking about…get this…I heard he went up by the Sea of Galilee and SO MANY people followed him because of crazy stuff he’s doing…that like, they were all sitting around and it was late…and he told his buddies to get bread for the whole crowd…and get this, it was like 5,000 people…and you know his buddies, they just freaked out…thinking about how much it would cost to give everyone like a tiny bit of bread…well and another one spotted this kid who had a few loaves and a couple fish…but get this…the guy…yah the same one who’s been doing all the other crazy stuff…he took that tiny amount of food…and he said a prayer…and somehow…I don’t know how but somehow he managed to multiple it so that everyone ate…and there’s more…because after they ate…there was a ton of leftovers…I mean they started with hardly anything, but there was like 12 baskets left afterwards and he told them to pick it all up so the abundance wouldn’t get wasted.  Man…Now I’ve heard everything. (pause)

But wouldn’t you know it…the NEXT day…Get this, you remember the guy from yesterday…the bread and the fish and 5,000 people…dude there’s more…cuz last night, after that was all done…he went off up the mountain for a while, and his buddies, I think there’s like 12 of ‘em…they got in a boat and took off across the Sea for some reason…and one of those storms came up, you know like they do on the sea…and anyway, it was pretty rough and they were having a pretty hard time getting where they were trying to go…and you know they were freaked out right…I mean, I’ve been out on the sea when its rough too…comes out of nowhere and it can be scary, so I bet they were scared…but anyway out of nowhere…that same dude…he comes walking out to them…wait for it…ON THE WATER…You mean he wading in the water…NO MAN…HE WAS WALKING…ON THE WATER…You mean on top the water…Yah man…on top of the water…and his buddies were all kinds of freaked out…cuz, he’s on the water right…but he’s like…Dudes Its me, or maybe like I am or something like that…which isn’t that sorta like what God would say, but anyway, he told them not to be afraid…and then he was just with them in the storm while they were freaked out…can you believe that?  Man…Now I’ve heard…everything. (pause)

Here’s the funny thing about the gospel…and all these miracles or signs as John calls them…they keep happening don’t they? About the time we think we’ve heard it all, Jesus does something else unexpected…and blows our expectations out of the water…and maybe, just maybe as we consider all of these signs, including the two pretty impressive feats that Jesus pulls off in the lesson that we shared today…all we can is scratch our heads…and ponder on just who this guy is who can perform such awe-inspiring events.

Now interestingly enough…all over John’s gospel…scattered throughout the various interactions and miraculous signs and long periods of teachings…Jesus continues to remind us of just who he is…and he even said it today…I am.  Sometimes he uses this phrase as he compares himself to something else. I am the good shepherd…I am the vine…or even I am the bread of life…That particular one is coming right up just a few verses after where we leave off today…in fact the next 4 weeks will continue to feature the teaching of Jesus along with the interactions that this particular sign kicks off.

But sometimes Jesus simply calls himself I am…which happens right here in the midst of a storm as Jesus is walking on water. Now for the Jewish people…the name I am is a big deal…its synonymous with God…and the beginning of their culture all the way back in Exodus. Moses asks God what God’s name…and God says I am…if the people ask, tell them I am.

And as the disciples are in the boat, caught up in the wind and the waves, they might be crying out to God for deliverance…if you’ve ever been driving down the road when a giant rain storm comes blowing through, you’ve probably experienced that same sort of tension and terror…low and behold…in their fear…in this tension…in the midst of the frightening unknown…here comes Jesus doing something miraculous…something impossible…something that defies all logic. Something that can only be done by a being that is way more powerful than we are…

Now we’ve heard these stories before…perhaps we’ve heard them enough that we almost take them for granted…but imagine you were there…and you hadn’t heard them before…and there’s this man who is doing things that no human being can do.  And this man claims the name of God…

Could it be possible that God would be found in the human? That the divine…that which is so much bigger or larger or greater than we are would be found in a human body? Could it be? He performs these amazing miracles so maybe? (pause) Maybe, just maybe God would be found here among us…flawed and broken though we are. (pause)

But if that’s the case…I can’t help but think that it might raise some questions…or even some concerns for us as we hear these miraculous stories.  It would seem that Jesus performs miracle after miracle. Constantly doing things to better the lives of those he encounters…feeding them…healing them…and maybe, just maybe we start wonder why we don’t see the same sort of thing today.  We express faith in the same Lord right…in the same Jesus…and I wonder how many people might look at their own circumstance and wonder…where’s my miracle.

Diseases that go uncured.  Accidents that happen out of nowhere.  Jobs are lost…careers are destroyed.  Violence harms the innocent…we see all kinds of stuff like this every day don’t we…perhaps we even experience it…and maybe just maybe we wonder are those stories true.

And here’s the thing that ups the tension…we can’t prove that the miracles happened…I believe they did, let me be clear about that…but we can’t prove it…but we can still find something hopeful and reassuring if we pay attention to the little details.  That night on the water…as the disciples were straining against the oars…frightened out of their minds as a Galilee storm swept up the waves around them. Jesus miraculously came walking out ON the water…defying all logic…but what Jesus did not do in this case…was stop the storm.  He could have…we know he could have because we hear other stories when he does just that.

But this time…Jesus, the one they call the Christ…the Word of God made flesh…the divine in the human…the one who calls himself I am…he doesn’t stop the storm…he just appears to them in the midst of it.

So maybe the take away for us today…is not to be looking for a miraculous event to save us when things get lousy.  It might happen…but it might not either…and so maybe the only thing we can do is trust that we have God who is willing to be there with us in the midst of whatever storm is raging….because we have a God who loves humanity SO much…that the divine was willing to take on the flesh and dwell among us…to show us that the divine and human can and will be together…and in doing this God has made us a promise…that no matter what happens…no matter what storms start blowing…the one who can feed 5000 people with 5 loaves and 2 fish and leave an abundance on the other side of it…the same one who has the power to walk on water…this same God will never ever forsake us…that’s the promise, whether we find ourselves in a moment when we can believe it, or whether our circumstances make us doubt it…the promise remains, and nothing will separate you from the love of the one who makes this promise to you.

And with that promise…when you’ve heard it in your mind and in your heart…then my friends…you’ve heard everything. Amen